Body Language

Whether realized or not, it is obvious that wherever the concept of language occurs, the concept of culture occurs. That is mainly because language is deeply embedded in culture. … is innate and how much is culturally defined? Are there any true universal nonverbal cues or just universal tendencies modified to suit cultural ideals and constraints? It is my proposal that of all forms of nonverbal communication the most universal is the communication of emotions through facial expression.

Other channels of nonverbal communication are also of great importance in many cultures. However which channels are emphasized, what cues are considered acceptable and the symbolic meaning of the cues may vary chicken soup for the soul Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are … from culture to culture.

Ekman and Friesen (1969 ;and discussed in Ekman and Keltner, 1997) undertook an important cross-cultural study to determine how easily and accurately people from various literate Western and non-Western cultures could identify the appropriate emotion term to match photographs they were shown. The photographs were of Caucasian faces posed in certain facial expressions. The terms the subjects were given to choose from were happiness, surprise, disgust, contempt, anger, fear and sadness. The result was consistent Anthropology

Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are … evidence of agreement across all cultures examined. In order to rule out the possibility that exposure to mass-media had taught the subjects to recognize Caucasian facial expressions Ekman and Friesen undertook a similar study among a visually isolated culture in New Guinea (Ekman, 1972).

A different methodology was used ;people were shown the photographs of posed Caucasian facial expressions and were asked to make up a story about the person and the moments leading up to that image. From these Chicken Soup For The Soul Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are … stories Ekman and Friesen concluded that these subjects were able to identify the emotions accurately.

The one exception was that there seemed to be some confusion between surprise and fear expressions. Similar research was undertaken by Heider and Rosch (reported in Ekman, 1972) with the intent of disproving Ekman and Friesen. However, the data gathered also supported Ekman and Friesen’s conclusions. A similar experiment (Argyle, 1975) compared the perception of the emotions of English, Italian and Japanese performers Anthropology Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation.

Its main components are … by subjects from these three countries. The results (reported in Argyle, 1975) were as follows: Both the English and Italian subjects could identify their own and each others emotions but had difficulty with the Japanese. The Japanese subjects were able to identify the emotions of the English and Italians better than those groups had been able to judge the Japanese. However the Japanese subjects had difficulty determining Japanese facial expressions. This would seem to indicate that the Japanese face Eating Disorders

During any given day, the American society is inundated by our perception of the ideal woman. The ideal of a slim and slender body bombards young women on television, … does not express emotion in the same manner as those of other cultures. However, another experiment (Ekman and Keltner, 1997) demonstrated different results. American and Japanese subjects were observed while watching films designed to evoke fear and disgust. During part of this observation the subjects were videotaped while watching the film alone.

It was presumed that during this time no social rules would restrict the subject’s display of emotion. No difference existed between the American and the Japanese subjects in Culture Vs. Race Anthropologists have always had their discrepancies with the word culture and its background significance. There have been numerous definitions that have filtered through the field, yet not one that everyone … the display of emotion when alone. When watching the film with an authority figure (the researcher) present the Japanese were more likely than the Americans to hide negative emotions with a smile.

Observation of children who were born deaf and blind show that they make the same emotional expressions (Ekman and Keltner, 1997). There is no way that these children could have learned this behaviour through sensory input. Similarly, a study involving sighted babies under six months of age Philosophy of Man I: Perception Philosophy of Man I: Perception “Linguistic ability affects man in his specifically animal operations. ” Discuss with reference to any one of the senses. … has showed that they react with fear to negative faces (Segerstrale and Molnar, 1997).

These infants were too young to have learned which faces had negative connotations. It would have to be an innate response. Although different cultures define when and where it is acceptable to display certain emotions (i. e. crying at a funeral may or may not be expected) and the stimulus that triggers a certain emotion may vary from culture to culture, the facial expression of emotions seems Time and Culture In The Dance of Life: The Other Dimension of Time (Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1983), anthropologist Edward T. Hall entitles his first chapter “Time as Culture. An extreme stance perhaps, especially given … to be a universal. There may be an evolutionary advantage to this form of communication. When people are communicating they tend to mimic the faces one another make. It has been shown that making a face associated with an emotional response actually causes the person to feel that emotion (Ekman, 1977). This shared empathy would have aided in facilitating group harmony and communicating states of mind. While facial expressions may be universal (although subject to cultural rules) the use of Time And Culture

In The Dance of Life: The Other Dimension of Time (Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1983), anthropologist Edward T. Hall entitles his first chapter “Time as Culture. ” An extreme stance perhaps, especially given … the rest of the body as a communicative tool is widely varied from culture to culture. Although there seem to be some universal tendencies (Morain, 1978) Birdwhistell’s comment that “there are probably no universal symbols of emotional state” ;seems to be true (1970). Although the body is an important channel of communication in every culture the information that the body conveys and the manner in which it conveys it varies greatly.

This is illustrated in the contrast between Japanese and Time And Culture In The Dance of Life: The Other Dimension of Time ;Anthropologist Edward T. Hall entitles his first chapter “Time as Culture. ” ;An extreme stance perhaps, especially given the potency … Arab nonverbal communication styles. Japanese conversation involves a great deal of ritual and prescribed answers. Much of the information in an encounter is transmitted on nonverbal channels. It is important to the Japanese that emotions not be shown in public.

This applies to both negative (sorrow, anger) and positive (joy) emotions, although more strongly to negative emotions. A poker face is considered ideal in public, in private a faint smile is acceptable. In most situations sorrow or displeasure cultural protectionism Essay #1 Ramya Mehul MCOM 250 The fine line that used to separate human beings from animals was the phenomenon of speech and imagination. But the great divide … must not be shown, it is preferable to mask negative feelings with a smile than display them (Morisaki and Gudykunst, 1994). The Japanese do not look one another

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