Dont Judge A Book By It

10 October 2017

& # 8217 ; s Cover: A Twelfth Night Comparrison Of Feste And Sir Andrew Essay, Research Paper

Don? T Judge A Book By It? s Cover

Expressions can be lead oning, and in the instance of Sir Andrew and Feste the sap, the

statement surely applies. Looking at the personalities of these two characters

throughout Twelfth Night, no 1 will see that each character is the exact antonym of each

other. Their comparing is their contrast. The first, Sir Andrew, is of? foolish humor? , who

expressions that portion he is supposed to play on the exterior. He looks sophisticated and really

intelligent. Yet when really talking with this character, the opposite applies and he

truly is merely a sap. And Feste, the other character, looks the portion of a sap and is used for

mere amusement. Yet on the interior, he exhibits the head of an intelligent individual, possibly

even a bookman. These two characters compare in their utmost differences.

A sap must look the portion every bit good as drama the portion. But does Feste make this? He does

this rather good really. But so how can one name him witty and intelligent? It is fundamentally

because he merely plays the portion of a sap. The cardinal word is? dramas? . He is non truly a sap.

He states? I wear non motley in my brain. ? ( pp.28 ) . This quotation mark reinforces that he merely

wears the apparels of a sap on the outside, but his over brimming sum of intelligence

shows he is a existent individual, with ideas, thoughts and remarks to be made. Merely being a

sap may curtail him from making such. Throughout the drama, Feste acts every bit witty as a

troublemaker. He does acquire to utilize his humor, merely non in an ideal manner. Unlike Sir Andrew,

he does non boast about qualities he does non posses. Feste has many endowments that do non travel

unnoticed. He may be considered the most intelligent individual I

n the whole dramatis personae of

characters.

Sir Andrew Aguecheek is a lover of life and a pure sap. He looks the portion of a

baronial adult male, and attempts to play the portion as good. Even his rubric, ? Sir? , refers to a knight. But

what is he truly like? ? He? s as tall a adult male as any? s in Illyria? ( pp.14 ) , harmonizing to Sir

Toby Belch. Toby is really misguided though, since Andrew is no more than a foolish rummy.

The lone thing that separates his personality from Sir Toby? s is that he is a natural sap. In

a scene, Feste foremost says, ? Beshrew me, knight? s in admirable fooling: , and Andrew answers,

? Ay, he does good plenty if he be disposed, and so make I, excessively. He does it with better grace,

but I do it more natural. ? ( pp.58 ) . Andrew himself is saying that he is a sap by nature.

Clearly he looks the portion of a refined gentleman. He says he speaks another linguistic communication but

when spoken to in that linguistic communication, he doesn? t understand it. And this shows to be more

cogent evidence that Andrew is a sap hidden behind a mask of a baronial individual.

A all right comparing was made between these two important characters. A sap who is

smart, and a Lord who is a sap. Shakespeare truly is superb, since he though up

such an luxuriant narrative that says looks can be lead oning. And that statement sticks out

field as twenty-four hours. The following buffoon on the street that you see could be the smartest individual to

of all time walk the Earth, and the same goes with the following smart looking instructor you see. On

the other manus he/she could be a echt imbecile. So as a concluding proposition, Shakespeare asks

us to non judge a individual by their outer wear and their bogus public behaviour. The lone

contradiction with this statement is that since Shakespeare lived in the 1600? s, he was

brought up to make merely the opposite. Sad, but true.

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