Effect of watching cartoon to the children

7 July 2016

“A child’s life is like a piece of paper on which every person leaves a mark” – Chinese Proverb. Children are fun on watching cartoons so as a result they get addicted that give different health problems. This has become a problem because too many children are watching too much television that tend to be violent and addictive. There are a lot of time spending in watching television that set for long hours which outdoor activities are forgotten and mostly without the supervision of elders who are completely unaware that this might have certain effects on their psychological development later on displayed in their behavior patterns.

Children are more likely to have mental and emotional problems, along with brain and eye injuries and unexpectedly risk of a physical problem increases. It can even affect the social interaction of the child. Watching cartoons is now a hobby of children rather than other activities such as reading books and playing outdoor activities. Young children are may not be able to read lengthy stories or books. But they will be happy to watch the TV, especially cartoon movies. Children are enjoying watching cartoons because of the funny and weird figures of animals and humans that can be seen.

Effect of watching cartoon to the children Essay Example

Not only bright and varied colors but also the cartoon characters played an important role in getting the attention of the children. There should be a limitation on everything especially the hours spending in watching cartoons that should be properly regulated by parents. Children like to watch cartoon movies on the TV even before they start to speak. Do you know why? I think it is because of the funny and weird figures of animals and humans that appear in cartoons. Not only that, but the bright and varied colors the cartoon characters are painted with also play an important role in attracting children.

But is it good for children to watch cartoons on the TV? But what are the effects of watching cartoons to the children. Statement of the problems The study intends to investigate the negative effects of watching cartoons to the children. Specifically, 1 How does cartoon affect the social interaction of a child? 1. ) What are the psychological effects of watching cartoons to the children? Significance of the study The main purpose of this research, in the light of these thoughts, is to demonstrate how children are influenced by violence-oriented cartoons on TV and through what kind of behaviors these influences appear.

The purpose is also to compare them to see how they changed. This study will promote information about the negative effects of watching cartoons to the children. This study will also be beneficial to the parents to know how to monitor their children when watching cartoons in the television. By understanding the needs of the children and effects of watching cartoons, these parents and children will be informed about safety precautions. Scope and limitation of the study This study was conducted to determine the psychological effects of watching television to the children .

The study will include 5 male and 5 female children ages 6 to 7 years old on Peace Village, Phase III Brgy. San Luis, Antipolo City. The researcher would like to look into the psychological and social effects of watching cartoons. The study does not cover the negative effects of watching cartoons to the physical well-being of the children. The researcher also does not include the benefits of watching cartoons to the children. Operational Terms Television – According to the study of Trinidad A. Cayading, It became a substitute to babysitters.

Numbs – It is the effect of watching Television to the mind of the children that prevents your child from exercising initiative, being intellectually challenged, thinking analytically, and using his imagination, by Trinidad A. Cayading. Clay- According to Trinidad A. Cayading, The mind of a child is like a clay. It forms early impressions on what it sees, and these early impressions determine how he sees the world and affect his grown-up behavior Media violence- According to the research of Trinidad A. Cayadin, children who are more exposed to media violence behave more aggressively as kids and when they are older.

Interactive media- According to the experimental study of Daluz, Christine Joyce, It refers to products and services on digital computer-based systems which respond to the user’s actions by presenting content such as text, graphics, animation, video, audio, games, etc. Aggressive cognitions – (or aggressive thoughts) include a wide range of phenomena, such as cognitive accessibility of simple aggressive, by Mapoy, Mark Joel D. Aggressive behaviors – According to Mapoy, Mark Joel D. are actions with which one intends and expects to harm another individual.

Violence – According to Stevie Hossler, is when a child’s act become aggressive or use harmful actions towards others. Brains’ development – According to Stevie Hossler study, Our Brain’s Development is a dynamic mix of nature and nurture. Attention deficit disorder – According to Robert Leu study, it is the effect to the children who watched three to four hours of television daily. Impressionable mindsets – Ben Wilcox research state that, It is the act of children who view shows in which violence is very realistic, frequently repeated or unpunished, are more likely to imitate what they see.

CHAPTER II: Review of Related Literature Local studies Prevent Kids from being Smart. SOMETIMES, watching TV in the house is very hard to avoid because almost everyone, siblings, as well as parents, are usually tuned in to the TV. In some homes, the television is perpetually on even without anyone watching. Nowadays, it is very common for parents and caregivers to use TV as substitute babysitters. Also, many parents buy DVDs, CDS or whatever they think can make their kids smart. But how does watching TV really affect children?

This article wants to share with you some bad news which majority of the experts thinks that a TV/video-driven culture has bad effects on kids – and may prevent kids from being smart. They cite the following: TV viewing takes away the time your child needs to develop important skills like language, creativity, motor, and social skills. These skills are developed in the kids’ first two years (a critical time for brain development) through play, exploration, and conversation. Your kid’s language skills, for example, do not improve by passively listening to the TV.

It is developed by interacting with people, when talking and listening is used in the context of real life. TV viewing numbs your kid’s mind as it prevents your child from exercising initiative, being intellectually challenged, thinking analytically, and using his imagination. TV viewing takes away time from reading and improving reading skills through practice (Comstock, 1991). Kids watching cartoons and entertainment television during pre-school years have poorer pre-reading skills at age 5 (Macbeth, 1996). Also, kids who watch entertainment TV are also less likely to read books and other print media (Wright & Huston, 1995).

According to Speech and language expert Dr. Sally Ward, 20 years of research show that kids who are bombarded by background TV noise in their homes have trouble paying attention to voices when there is also background noise. Kids who watch a lot of TV have trouble paying attention to teachers because they are accustomed to the fast-paced visual stimulation on TV. Kids who watch TV more than they talk to their family have a difficult time adjusting from being visual learners to aural learners (learning by listening). They also have shorter attention spans. School kids

who watch too much TV also tend to work less on their homework. When doing homework with TV on the background, kids tend to retain less skill and information. When they lose sleep because of TV, they become less alert during the day, and these results in poor school performance. TV exposes your kid to negative influences, and promotes negative behavior. TV shows and commercials usually show violence, alcohol, drug use and sex in a positive light. The mind of your kid is like clay. It forms early impressions on what it sees, and these early impressions determine how he sees the world and affect his grown-up behavior.

For instance, twenty years of research has shown that children who are more exposed to media violence behave more aggressively as kids and when they are older. By: Trinidad A. Cayading Risk on Children’s Memory. An experimental study examined the influence of interactive media on primary graders memory. Interactive media normally refers to products and services on digital computer-based systems which respond to the user’s actions by presenting content such as text, graphics, animation, video, audio, games, etc.

So we sample 40 first graders from an Elementary School in the Philippines were randomly assigned to experience a computer-based story in 1 of 4 presentation modes (audio narration of the story, similar to radio; audiovisual presentation, similar to television; interactive viewing, and interactive observation). They were asked to listen, watch, interactively participate or observe during a storytelling activity and were asked later to answer a (a) narration-based questions; (b) visually-dependent questions; and (c) inference questions.

The results showed that among students who had the storytelling activity, the ones under the condition of audio only remembered the story poorly, including the story facts and ability to make inferences. However, the effect of interactive media for this present study was identified to be non-contributing factor of facilitation of memory retrieval. Participants in the Audio-visual condition performed better than those in the Audio condition. Likewise, participants in the Audio-visual condition performed better than those in the interactive.

Lastly, Audio-visual participants performed better than those on the interactive observer. By: Daluz, Christine Joyce Media Violence Harmful effects on Children’s behavioral Aggression Many summaries of the effects of viewing media violence have been compiled by independent governmental and nongovernmental health organizations. All have found significant harmful effects on children and youth (e. g. , the 1954 Kefauver hearings; the 1969 National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence; the 1972 Surgeon General’s report Television and GrowingUp [U. S.

Surgeon General’s Scientific Advisory Committee, 1972]; the 1982 National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH] report Television and Behavior; Eron, Gentry, & Schlegel’s 1994 report for the American Psychological Association; the 1994 Policy Statement by the Australian College of Paediatrics, the 2000 Joint Statement on the Impact of Entertainment Violence on Children by six health associations; the 2004 Ontario Office for Victims of Crime report Action Agenda: A Strategic Blueprint for Reducing Exposure to Media Violence in Canada; and the 2005 American Psychological Association Resolution on Violence in Video Games and Interactive Media [Carll et al. , 2005]). Depending upon how specific or broad one categorizes media violence effects, one can identify 14 (or more) scientifically documented effects of exposure to media violence, found in at least five conceptually distinct domains: physiological, emotional, cognitive, attitudinal, and behavioral. These can be further broken down into short-term and long-term effects (for a detailed discussion, see Potter, 1999; 2003). Other summaries focus on four main types of effects: increases in aggressive thoughts, aggressive behavior, aggressive feelings, and physiological arousal.

In addition, media violence exposure has been linked to decreases in helpful and pro-social behaviors. Furthermore, violent media exposure has been shown to cause an increase in aggression-supporting beliefs and a reduction of normal negative emotional responses to violence (Anderson et al. , 2003; Carnagey, Anderson, & Bushman, 2007), as well as increases in fear (Cantor,2003). Some media violence effects can be seen in immediate settings, whereas others accumulate over time. The multiplicity of media violence effects requires multiple research methods in a wide variety of settings. How is the research actually conducted? Most media violence

studies focus on the impact of exposure to media violence on aggressive affect, aggressive cognitions, and/or aggressive behaviors. Aggressive affect comprises emotional reactions, such as anger, which are relatedto aggressive behavior. Aggressive cognitions (or aggressive thoughts) include a wide range of phenomena, such as cognitive accessibility of simple aggressive 24 Gentile, Saleem, and Anderson concepts in memory; beliefs and attitudes that promote aggression; and plans and expectations (e. g. , scripts) concerning conflict situations. As noted earlier, aggressive behaviors are actions with which one intends and expects to harm another individual. Because of space limitations, we focus on aggressive behavior (i. e. ,aggression).

By: Mapoy, Mark Joel D. Foreign Studies Obstruction to the Development of a child’s Brain Social Systems. From the time children start school to the time that they graduate they are averaged to spend around 13,000 hours in school. This may seem like an awful lot of hours to attend school unless it is compared to the hours a child watches television, which is nearly 18,000 hours (from the time school is started to the time of graduation). This comparison is an outrage because of the amount of television that is watched by a child will have an effect on their brain, emotions and their sense to feel pain. In a 2000 report on adolescent violence, the U. S.

Surgeon General David Satcher stated that more aggressive behavior in a young child’s life is caused by frequently watched entertainment that incorporates violence in it. This has become a public health issue and because of the research findings; the American Psychological Association passed a resolution in February of 1985,informing broadcasters and the public about the dangers violence on the television has on children. Three major effects have been proven by psychological research caused by children seeing violence on television are that the child may become less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others; children who watch violence do not fear violence nor are they bothered by violence in general and the children are more likely to become aggressive or use harmful actions towards others.

When we are born we have the capacity for motivation, experience, and training, and because of this our minds are very impressionable. Therefore, our brains’ development is a dynamic mix of nature and nurture, so it is important to choose a healthy environment for all children. This means cartoons with violence will be unhealthy for a child because in general, being interactive with any environment enhances the development of a successful brain. As a result, a tremendous amount of childhood involvement with electronic media can limit social interaction and may obstruct the development of a brain’s social systems. By: Stevie Hossler Unhealthy Effect on the Brain and Eyes

In December 1997, an episode of the Japanese cartoon “Pocket Monster” (later renamed “Pokemon” for international distribution) drew worldwide attention after multiple cases of children suffering seizures after watching the episode were reported (Warner, 2004). Parents began to wonder how the cartoons their children watched affected their mental development. While no former study specifically relating to cartoons has taken place, multiple studies over the years have charted the impact of television on the minds and eyes of developing children. Most eye specialists agree that watching television is not a danger to the eyes, as long as children watch in the right conditions.

The room should not be pitch black, and children should not sit closer than five feet away from the screen. Sitting in a dark room or closer than five feet will not damage the eyes, but will result in eye fatigue. (Adams, 1992). As for the brain, there is scientific evidence that too much television can be detrimental to children. The April 2004 issue of the medical journal Pediatrics published a study done by Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center of Seattle, Washington. The study revealed that children who watched three to four hours of television daily had a 30 to 40 percent greater risk of developing attention deficit disorder than children who did not watch television. While no specific program is directly responsible, Dr.

Dimitri Christakis, leader of the study, speculates that the speed of the images displayed could affect children’s brains (Today’s Chiropractic, 2004). But does watching television give young children seizures? Yes, and no. A study released by The New England Journal of Medicine in July 2004 found that most children who suffered seizures from that December 1997 episode of “Pocket Monsters” had epilepsy, or some other underlying condition that would have caused development of seizures, regardless of whether or not they saw that program (Warner, 2004). By: Robert Leu Bad influence on Children’s Behavior Television has long been criticized for influencing our children. People complain that certain TV shows are having negative effects on their children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) both feel that TV does influence the behavior of children as young as one year old. From their studies, the AACAP states, “Children who view shows in which violence is very realistic, frequently repeated or unpunished, are more likely to imitate what they see. ” This speaks to the impressionable mindsets of young children, who are still learning control of their minds and bodies, and are likely to mimic what they see, as it seems quite normal to them. The AACAP also stresses the need for parents to keep a close eye on what their children watch. They must be there, the AACAP says, to explain that the cartoon character or actor that was shot has not been harmed, but would actually be seriously injured, or die in real life.

They should also work to tell their children that violent behavior is not the best course of action to resolve a conflict. The AAP states “Neuroscientists have shown that environmental experiences significantly shape the developing brain. ” This again adds to the idea that young children are very impressionable. They paid more attention to the effect of TV on children in their daily lives. “Higher levels” the AAP states, “of television viewing correlate with lowered academic performance, especially reading scores. This may be because television substitutes for reading practice, partially because the compellingly visual nature of the stimulus blocks development of left-hemisphere language circuitry.

A young brain manipulated by jazzy visual effects cannot divide attention to listen carefully to language. ” TV is a very quick medium. Messages are shot at the viewer as if by an automatic rifle. Their minds must be equally as quick to interpret the messages, and with such a “two-minute mind”, many messages are misinterpreted, or confused. When the child becomes used to receiving information at so fast a rate, they lose interest in information that is more detailed and methodical, such as the information received in day-to-day schooling. Television certainly does affect our children, who find themselves mesmerized by the bright flashing objects, and rapid assault of messages.

It is good to know that the leaders of our medical professions feel that parents and supervisors of children are able to help slow the information down, and explain what the messages really mean, so as to have a more positive effect on our children. By: Ben Wilcox Conceptual Framework CHAPTER III: Methodology Sample Questions: 1. Do you enjoy watching cartoons? 2. Are you a fan of cartoon characters? 3. Do you learn something when you watch cartoons? 4. Does your parents know what you watch? 5Do you understand what you’re watching? 6. Do you prefer watching cartoons rather than going outside? Interview: 1. How long do you spend time in watching cartoons than in school works? 2. Do you portray the cartoon character you love the most? 3. What activity or games you usually play outside with your friends? Research Design

This study entitled “The Effects of Watching Cartoons to the Children” is a qualitative and quantitative research that attempts to accumulate information and data in Peace Village, Phase III Brgy. San Luis, Antipolo City. This study wishes to depict the current state of discipline of 5 male and 5 female children ages 6 to 7after watching Cartoons. The researcher decided to use the qualitative and quantitative approach in order to verify his observations. Quantitative Analysis We conduct a research interview regarding in our topic. This is the frequency of the children who answers “yes and no” in the given questions. “Do you enjoy watching cartoons? ” (10 out of 10 answers Yes to that question). “Are you a fan of cartoon characters?

”(8 out of 10 answers Yes to that question). “Do you learn something when you watch cartoons? ” (4 out 10 answers Yes to that question). “Do your parents know what you watch? ” (4 out of 10 answers Yes to this question). “Do you understand what you’re watching? ” (5 out 10 answers Yes to this question). “Do you prefer watching cartoons rather than going outside? ” (7 out of 10 answers Yes to this question) Qualitative Analysis According to their answers, we can conclude that they only watch cartoon because of its humorous contents, colors, graphics and animation. In their age, they are still in the process of understanding things that they see.

But even though they don’t quite understand what they are watching, they still prefer watching Cartoons rather than going outside. So as a result, it causes negative effects to their health. Procedures The day we interview the children in Peace Village,Phase III Brgy. San Luis, Antipolo City, we asked the children one by one to know their reactions. They are asked some several questions regarding on their feedback in watching cartoons. Ten children participated, 5 boys and 5 girls was asked and interviewed. Children’s ages ranged from 6 to 7 years old. We show them a small portion of the show called “Tom and Jerry”. After that we asked them some questions answerable by YES or NO. We also interview them.

We asked how long they spend time in watching cartoons than their in school works, if they portray their cartoon character love most, and what activity they play usually outside with their friends. As a result of our questions and interviews, we can conclude that children enjoy watching cartoons even they don’t understand what they watch. Statistical treatment powerpoint: title. Statement of the problems Signifance Scope and limitation Operational terms – 4. coming from literature. Foreign / local… Summarizing atleast 4 ( 2 – 3 sentence. ) conceptual framework = arrow relationships. Chapter 3 = methodology. Research design = descriptive method I search meaning. ( analyzing or interpreting) = procedure. > survey/ questions > interview Question question will to research question.

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