Employee Welfare Measures

9 September 2016

Employee welfare is an important facet of industrial relations, the extra dimension, giving satisfaction to the worker in a way which even s a good wage cannot. With the growth of industrialization and mechanization, it has acquired added importance. The workers in the industry cannot cope with the pace of modern life with minimum sustenance amenities. He needs an added stimulus to keep body and soul together. Employees have also realized the importance of their role in providing these extra amenities. And yet, they are not always able to fulfill workers demands however reasonable they might be.

They are not primarily concerned with the viability of the enterprise. Employee welfare, though it has been proved to contribute to efficiency in production, is expensive. Each employer depending on his priorities gives varying degrees of importance to labour welfare. It is because the government is not sure that all employees are progressive mined and will provide basic welfare measures that it introduces statutory legislation from time to time to bring about some measures of uniformity in the basic amenities available to industrial workers.

Employee Welfare Measures Essay Example

After employees have been hired, trained and remunerated, they need to be retained and maintained to serve the organization better. Welfare facilities are designed to take care of the wellbeing of the employees, they do not generally result in any monetary benefit to the employees. Nor are these facilities provided by employees alone. Governmental and non-governmental agencies and trade unions too, contribute towards employee welfare.

Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various service benefits and facilities offered top the employees by the employer through such general fringe benefits the employer makes the life worth living for the employees. The welfare amenities are extended in addition to normal wages another economic reward available to employees as per the legal provisions. Welfare may also be provided by the government, trade unions and non-government agencies in addition to the employers. The basic purpose if the employee welfare is to enrich the life of the employees and keep them happy and contented.

Welfare means faring or doing well. It refers to physical, mental moral and emotional wellbeing of an individual. Further the term welfare is a relative concept, relative in time and space. It therefore varies from time to time, from region to region and country to country. It is also referred to as betterment work for employees, relates to taking care of wellbeing of workers by employers trade unions, government and non-governmental agencies TYPES OF WELFARE ACTIVITIES: The meaning of labour welfare may be clearer by listing the activities and facilities, which are referred to as welfare measures.

A comprehensive list of welfare activities on labour welfare into two broad groups, namely: 1. Welfare measures inside the work place; 2. Welfare measures outside the work place. 1. Welfare Measures inside the Work Place a) Conditions of the work Environment Safety and cleanliness: attention to approaches. Housekeeping Workshop sanitation and cleanliness. Control of effluents Convenience and comfort during work Distribution of work hours Workmen’s safety measures Supply of necessary beverages Notice Boards Conveniences Provision of drinking water

Urinals and bathrooms Provision for spittoons Canteen services Rest rooms and reading rooms C) Worker’s Health Services Factory health center Dispensary Ambulance Emergency aid Health education d) Women and Child Welfare Services Creche and child care Separate services for woman workers Family planning e) Workers’ recreation Indoor games; strenuous games to be avoided during intervals of work  f) Economic services Co operatives, loans, financial grants Thrift and savings schemes Unemployment insurance Profit sharing and bonus schemes Gratuity and pension ) Workers education Reading room Library Adults education Daily news review Factory news bulletin 1. 2

IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY * Employers get stable labor force by providing welfare facilities. Workers take active interest in their jobs and work with a feeling of involvement and participation. * It improves moral & loyalty of workers. * It reduces labor turnover & absenteeism. * It helps in increasing productivity & efficiency by improving physical & mental health. * It helps in improving industrial relation & industrial peace . 3 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM: A voluntary approach on the part of the management to offer welfare programmes which are over and above what is laid down by the law would boost the employees and motivate them to perform better. A preliminary study conducted by the researcher with respect to welfare showed that there was scope for improvement in certain areas. This formed the basis of the research problem. A study was conducted on the safety and welfare measures provided to the employees of POWER SOAPS LTD .

A majority of 81% of the respondents was found to be satisfied with the WELFARE measures at, POWER SOAPS LTD, most of the employees were satisfied with the facilities provided in the organization. A majority of the respondents feel secure while working at POWER SOAPS LTD and feel that the safety measures help to reduce the severity of actions. Even though 56% of them perceive a risk factor while working at , a majority of 90% never avoid work due to this risk factor. The study again shows that there is a Random sampling of respondent’s opinion in the satisfactory region regarding the level of satisfaction of welfare measures.

This reveals that a majority of respondents are satisfied with the existing welfare measures. The management may take up steps to convert these into highly satisfactory. The few welfare measures which were dissatisfactory were transport facilities, rest room facilities and the time lapse in compassionate appointments. The management may concentrate on these areas to increase the satisfaction level of employees towards the welfare measures. 1. 4 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY 1. To study the welfare facilities provided to the employee by POWER SOAPS LTD. 2.

To find out the expectations of workers with regard to the welfare facilities. 3. To analyze the extent of utilizations of welfare facilities. 4. To analyze the satisfaction level of the employees. 5. To make constructive suggestions to improve the welfare. 1. 5 DESIGN HYPOTHESIS: Null Hypothesis(H0): There is no association between the and Alternative Hypothesis(H1): There is an association between the and 1. 3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY: * The study has been conducted with a view to understand the effectiveness of employee’s welfare measures and satisfaction level of employees regarding the facilities. The project enlighten on the need for employee’s welfare among the employees in the organization. * This project can be referred as a base for future oriented projects. 1. 7 GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE: The project research on EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEAURES has been done in POWER SOAPS LTD which is located at Villianur in Puducherry. 1. 8 FIELD WORK AND COLLECTION OF DATA: 1. 8. 1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research in common parlance refers to a search for knowledge. Research, simply put in an endeavor to discover answers to the problem through the application of scientific method to the knowledge universe.

DEFINITION: “Systematized efforts to gain knowledge” – Redman and Moray 1. 8. 2 RESEARCH DESIGN: The research design undertaken for the study is descriptive one. A study, which wants to portray the characteristics of a group or individual or situation, is known as descriptive study. It is mostly qualitative in nature. The main objective of descriptive study is to acquire knowledge. In the present study, descriptive method is used to study the prevailing organizational climate. 1. 8. 3 DATA COLLECTION:

In order to apply the statistical methods to any of enquiry it is essential that statistical data should be collected as statistical analysis is not possible in the absence of quantitative data. Data are obtained either through a survey or experiment. In social sciences where the use of statistical method is indispensible, data can be collected only through statistical surveys. The research should keep in mind two types of data. 1. Primary data 2. Secondary data PRIMARY DATA: Primary data means the information which is collected directly. It is also called first hand information.

Primary data was collected through Questionnaire. SECONDARY DATA: Secondary data was collected from various published books and company records. DEFINING THE POPULATION: The population can be finite or infinite. The population is said to be finite if it consists of fixed number of elements so that it is possible to enumerate it in its totality. For instance, the populations in the city, the number of workers in the factory are examples of finite population. Hence in this study of finite population has been taken. It consists of 210 employees. 1. 9 SAMLE SIZE: Sampling unit: POWER SOAPS LTD.

Sample Size: 50 Sampling Procedure: Simple Random Sampling. 1. 10 SIMPLE RANDOM SAMPLING: Simple random sampling is a special case of a random sample. A sample is called simple random ample if each unit of population has an equal chance of being selected for the sample. Whenever a unit is selected for the sample, the units of the population are likely to be selected. 1. 11 STATISTICAL TOOL: These are tools, which helps to analyze the collected data. This analysis contains various approaches like comparisons, detecting, accuracy, estimation etc. In my survey I applied some tools for analyzing raw data. . Percentage method 2. Chi square test 3. Correlation PERCENTAGE METHOD: The percentage method provides statistic and graphical displays that are useful for describing many types of variables. The percentage procedure is a good place to start looking at your data. For a percentage report and bar chart, you can arrange the distinct values in ascending or descending order, or you can order the categories by their percentage. The percentage report can be suppressed when a variable ha many distinct values. You can label charts with percentage. Percentage of respondents = No of respondents X 100

Total no of respondents CHI SQUARE METHOD: The following assumptions must be satisfied, before we step into Chi square test. 1. Each sample is a random sample. 2. The outcomes of various samples are all mutually independent. 3. Each observation may be categorized into exactly one of the categories or classes 4. There must be large observations. 5. For comparison purposes, the data must be in original units. 6. For a 2X2 table , all expected cell frequencies should be at least equal to 10. FORMULA : X2 = ? (O-E)2 E O = Observed Frequency E = Expected frequency

Chi square is used to test whether differences between observed and expected frequencies are significant or not. CORRELATION METHOD: Correlation is a statistical measurement of the relationship between two variables. Possible correlation range from +1 to -1. A zero correlation indicate that there is no relationship between the variables. A correlation of -1 indicates a perfect negative correlation, meaning that as one variable goes up, the other goes down . A correlation of +1 indicates a perfect positive correlation, meaning that both variable move in the same direction together. = ? XY ?X2 ? Y2 OPERATIONAL DEFINITION TO CHAMBERS DICTIONARY it is faring or doing well freedom from calamity, enjoyment of health prosperity etc. Therefore welfare denotes a condition of wellbeing, happiness satisfaction conservation and development of human resources. The concept of welfare is necessarily elastic in character. It varies in its interpretation from country and time to time, depending on the industrialization and general level of social and economic development. “ The effort to make life worth living for workmen “.

The labour Investigation Committee preferred to include under ‘Labour Welfare’: “Anything done for the intellectual, physical, moral and economic betterment of the workers, employers, by government or by other agencies over and about what is laid down by law or what is normally expected of the contractual benefits for which workers may have bargained. ” CHAPTER II 2. 1 REVIEW OF LITERATURE 1. Report of National Commission on Labour (2002), Government of India ,made recommendations in the area of labour welfare measures which includes social security, extending the application of the Provident Fund, gratuity and unemployment insurance etc.. . PRASAD (1984) pointed out that in many mines in Bihar workers were provided with facilities for drinking water, toilets and other facilities. 3. CHANDRA and SING (1983) found that the condition under which brick kiln workers live subhuman. There were no rest hours and workman in kiln was made to work even in the advanced stage of pregnancy. A series of study carried out by the labor bureau of India in a variety of industries showed a large of women working in Menes did not have separate arrangements, latrines and rest rooms shelters and creches were in neglected condition (1979). 4. NATIONAL COMMISSION (1972)

In conjunction with the passage of 1970of the occupational Safety and Health Act Congress established a National Commission undertake a compensation laws in order to determine if such provide an adequate, prompt, equitable system of compensation 5. NATIONAL COMMISSION (1969) The report of this commission was appointed in 1966 had reviewed many aspects of labor welfare in India such as existing conditions of labor. Legislative measures available to protect their interest level of workers earnings, standard of living and various welfare facilities, canteens, creches, housing, transportation, recreational facilities, provisions. . MANTRA has undertaken research on such areas as pollution control, mechanical and wet processing. Some of the on-going projects and effluent treatment and cleanliness of drinking water. 7. PETER ROGERS Chairman, The strategic forum for construction has taken up research in industries and has concluded that unsafe, disorganized and dirty organizations lead to poor standards and settling for a compromise in the needs mean risking of lives. 8. The OXFORD dictionary defines labor welfare an effort to make life worth living for work man. . CONVENTIONS AND RECOMMENDATION OF ILO (1949) sets forth a fundamental principle at its 26thconference held in Philadelphia recommended some of the measures in the area of welfare measures which includes adequate protection for life and health of workers in all occupations, provision for child welfare and maternity protection, provision of adequate nutrition, housing and facilities for recreation and culture, the assurance of equality of educational and vocational opportunity etc. 10. IN THE VIEW OF K. K.

CHAUDHURI, IN HIS HUMAN RESURCES: A Relook to the workplace, states that HR policies are being made flexible. From leaves to compensations, perks to office facilities, many companies are willing to customize polices to suit different employee segments. The older employees want social security benefits, younger employees want cash in hand because they can? t think of sticking to a company for many years and retire from the same company. Therefore „one jacket fits all? will not be right to motivate the talents and retainthem 11.

SHOBHA MISHRA & MANJU BHAGAT, in their “Principles for Successful Implementation of Labour Welfare Activities”, sated that labour absenteeism in Indian industries can be reduced to a great extent by providing good housing, health and family care, canteen, educational and training facilities and provision of welfare activities. The principle for successful implementation of labour welfare activities is nothing but an extension of democratic values in an industrialized society. 12. P. L.

RAO, in his “Labour Legislation in the Making”, opines that professional bodies like National Institute of Personnel Management should constitute a standing committee to monitor the proceeding in the Parliament regarding the labour welfare measures CHAPTER III 3. 1 INDUSTRIAL PROFILE: Soaps and Detergents are cleaning products that have become an essential part in our daily lives. Cleaning products play an essential role by safely and effectively removing dirts, germs and other contaminants, and thus promote a hygienic lifestyle. Toilet soaps account for the largest single share of about 10% in the Rs 480 billion FMCG market.

The toilet market is getting saturated at a high penetration level of 98% and is growing at a very modest rate. The toilet soap, once only an urban phenomenon, has now penetrated practically in all areas including remote rural areas. The incremental demand flows from population increase and rise in the usage norm impacted as it is by a greater concern for hygiene. Increased sales revenues would also expand from upgradation of quality or per unit value. The market is littered over with several leading national and global brands and a large number of small brands which have limited markets.

The popular and premium brands include Lifebuoy, Lux, Cinthol, Liril, Rexona, Shikaki, Nirma, Dettol etc. to name a few. The inventory, however, changes by the quarter-if not by the month. The market is expected to grow at rates ranging from under 4% to around 4. 5%. These are very modest rates considering that the lifestyles not only of urbanites, but even of well-off rural folks are changing at a very high pace. The leader in the toilet soap category, HLL enjoys a high market share, followed, a way behind by Godrej Consumer Products, Nirma, Reckitt Benckinser etc.

Detergent powders are laundry-cleaning products that are made using a synthetic surfactant in place of the metal fatty acid salts, which are used in soaps. Made in powder form, these detergents are also sold as laundry powders, hard surface cleansers, etc. Majority of the powder detergents has soap in their mixture of ingredients; however they basically function more as a foam depressant than as a surfactant. Detergents ,as a constituent of the overall chemicals industry, accounts for a near 9% of the total demand for all chemicals estimated at around Rs 315 billion.

Detergents, chemically known as alfa olefin sulphonates (AOS) are used as fabric brightening agent, anti-deposition agent, and stain remover and as a bleacher. The overall market is estimated at around Rs 28 billion. A major input for the production of detergents is a petrochemical, Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB), while soaps rely more on an inorganic chemical, caustic soda, a s a major input. Detergents are available as powder, bars and liquids. Bars make up for less than half of the market, while powders have more than a third of the market. Liquids have 12% presence in the market.

The bar market is dominated by Hindustan Lever(HLL) with a share of over 40% swayed by its brands. -Rin,wheel,555,shakti,OK. The super-premium market, making up for around 10% of the overall detergents market, is dominated by Surf Excel from HLL and Ariel from proctor & Gamble. The two together have a near 90% market with the rest coming in from players like Henkel SPIC. In the sub premium segment, Nirma from Nirma Soaps and Wheel from HLL are the major players with small presence from an array of brands like Trilo, Hipolin, Tide, Key, Chek, and others.

Toilet soaps and detergents, despite their divergent brands, are not well differentiated by the consumers. It is, therefore, not clear if it is the brand loyalty or experimentation lured by high volume media campaign, which sustains them. A consequence is that the market is fragmented and mercurial. It is obvious that this must lead to a highly competitive market. We can provide you detailed project reports on the following topics. Please select the projects of your interests.

Each detailed project reports cover all the aspects of business, from analysing the market, confirming availability of various necessities such as plant & machinery, raw materials to forecasting the financial requirements. The scope of the report includes assessing market potential, negotiating with collaborators, investment decision making, corporate diversification planning etc. in a very planned manner by formulating detailed manufacturing techniques and forecasting financial aspects by estimating the cost of raw material, formulating the cash flow statement, projecting the balance sheet etc.

We also offer self-contained Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility Studies, Market Surveys and Studies, Preparation of Techno-Economic Feasibility Reports, Identification and Selection of Plant and Machinery, Manufacturing Process and or Equipment required, General Guidance, Technical and Commercial Counseling for setting up new industrial projects on the following topics. Many of the engineers, project consultant & industrial consultancy firms in India and worldwide use our project reports as one of the input in doing their analysis. Laundry Soap|

Soaps are salt of the fatty acids or mixtures of such salts. Their are two kinds of soaps namely water soluble and water insoluble. Soaps are prepared either by neutralizing the preformed fatty acid with alkalies or by direct saponification of a fat or mixture of fats most popular surfactant that finds applications in household sector as well as in industrial sector. However, as far as demand is concerned household applications are clearly dominating partners. The demand for laundry soap is increasing day by day. There is very good scope for new investment. You can launch of this units. Plant capacity: 2 Tonnes/Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 12 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 23 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 61 Lakhs| Return: 33. 99%| Break even: 62. 70%| | | Toilet Soap| In the modern society due to awareness towards the hygiene, Toilet soap has how become the necessity of life. Urbanization and development to tourism industry has led to both increase in demand and improvement in the product quality. New technologies have also contributed their bit in the development process. As a result today the markets are flooded with a variety of soaps varying in both physical and functional attributes.

Various types of soaps available can broadly be categorized into three categories namely perfumed soap, carbolic soaps and medicated soaps. There is a tremendous scope for production in both of small and large scale due to the exponential growth of soap demands. The new entrepreneur can invest in this project. | Plant capacity: 1000 Kgs/Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 8 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 38 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 76 Lakhs| Return: 49. 41%| Break even: 40. 34%| Soap Coated Paper| This product is handy and cheap and has versatile application.

It is useful during travelling as one can carry in his pocket and after use it can be discarded. Being a hand and portable item, its popularity is grat and as it is cheap, it can be afforded by common man. There are a limited number of manufacturers producing this product and there be greater through proper advertisement. Hence its market potential is prosperous and a new entrepreneur can go in for this trade as it has great scope for a bright future. | Plant capacity: 90 Kgs /Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 4 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 7 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 19 Lakhs|

Return: 40. 83%| Break even: 53. 47%| Detergent Cake & Washing Powder| Detergent are complete washing or cleaning products. The synthetic detergent industry is one of the largest chemical process industries. Some important uses of detergent cake and powder are in hand soaps and shampoo; special protective creams, like cold creams, varnishing creams; cosmetics; cleaning of glass, metal painted surfaces; washing and treatment of food; household washing; removal of gelatine films; making antiseptic soaps etc. Detergent are doing an infinitely superior job of cleaning.

Present demand for detergent is 29,25,000 tonnes while that of soap is 12,55,000 tonnes. This industry has vast resources for earning profit and is a good investment policy for entrepreneurs. | Plant capacity: 600 Kgs/ Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 3 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 12 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 28 Lakhs| Return: 35. 06%| Break even: 55. 03%| Floor Cleaner| Floor and bathroom cleaner is a liquid type of cleaner has strong disinfecting action which kills germs and repels flies and insects. It is used to clean all types of floor surfaces made of ceramic, marble granite, mosaic, cement floor etc.

It is an antistatic type of floor cleaner and is specially formulated for washing antistatic/conductive PVC floors. The antistatic floor cleaning detergent is highly popular replacing soap because of its favorable characteristics. The cleaner is an aqueous based liquid supplied as concentrate which can be used with a diluting medium preferably clean water. As consumers all over the world have responded favorably and switched over to synthetic detergents from soap as a cleaning agent, development of this industry is growing at a fast rate.

A number of units are manufacturing a range of floor cleaners under various trade names and their market potential is gaining momentum with the rise in country? s population and public health awareness. There is good scope for entrepreneurs in this field. | Plant capacity: 1000 Ltrs/day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 25 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 31 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 94 Lakhs| Return: 51. 91%| Break even: 47. 78%| Cleaning Powder For Utensils (Vim Type Powder)| The powder commonly employed for the cleaning of household utensils is known as utensils cleaning powder.

It is available in the market in various trade names such as Vim, Biz etc. The manufacture of utensils cleaning powder is very simple and involve only mixing in proper quantity as given in formulation. There are hundreds of small scale units manufacturing cleaning powder and Govt. of India has reserved if for small or tiny units. There is no good market for sub-standard product, as it is available in plenty in the market. Of course, there is a heavy demand of good quality utensils cleaning powder. | Plant capacity: 800 Bags/Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 20 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 34 Lakhs| Return: 52. 69%| Break even: 46. 53%| Liquid Detergent|

When detergent is mentioned, the cake, bar or powder usually comes to mind. For small manufacturers, the best advice on making liquid detergents is to purchase an intermediate dodecyl benzene sulphonic acid (DDBSA) better known as acid slurry from primary producers. Liquid detergents which actually proceeded powders, are used mainly for fine wash and dish washing. It can undoubtedly be said that liquid detergents are an important part of today? cleanser markets of developed countries. In India, liquid detergent is still under development stage, except that is used in large quantities in textile mills for wet processing for textile goods. There are few organized and many unorganized sectors engaged in the manufacturing of liquid detergent. It has got good market over solid detergent. So it can be concluded that few entrepreneurs may enter in this fields. | Plant capacity: 400 Kgs/Day| Plant & machinery: Rs. 15 Lakhs| Working capital: Rs. 17 Lakhs| T. C. I: Rs. 61 Lakhs| Return: 26. 03%| Break even: 60. 43%| Soda Ash|

Soda Ash is a chemical trade name donated by the anhydrous Sodium Carbonate, or simply ‘Soda’. The dehydrate variety of soda ash is frequently known in commerce by the name ‘Sal Soda’. Soda Ash is also differentiated into two classes viz Natural Ash if the classes viz. Natural Ash if the salt is recovered from naturally occurring sodium carbonate, the synthetic ash if it is the product of the solvay or other similar commercial processes. Soda ash is used in number of industries as basic raw material. The use of soda ash in bifurcated as under. In manufacture of sodium silicate in combination with silica sand.

In the manufacture of glass and ceramics. In the manufacture of bichromates. Apart from the above, there are various other uses of soda ash. It is used as a raw material in the manufacture of glass, glassware, sodium silicate, paper and pulp. Future demand of soda ash would obviously depend upon growth of various end-use industries in coming five years. As easily be appraised by the review of past trend in production of each industry. There is good scope for new investment. | Plant capacity: 500000 MT/Annum| Plant & machinery: Rs. 30550 Lakhs| Working capital: -| T. C. I: Cost of Project Rs. 2100 Lakhs| Return: 44. 00%| Break even: 42. 00%| Traditionally, soap has been manufactured from alkali (lye) and animal fats (tallow), although vegetable products such as palm oil and coconut oil can be substituted for tallow. American colonists had both major ingredients of soap in abundance, and so soap making began in America during the earliest colonial days. Tallow came as a by-product of slaughtering animals for meat, or from whaling. Farmers produced alkali as a by-product of clearing their land; until the nineteenth century wood ashes served as the major source of lye.

The soap manufacturing process was simple, and most farmers could thus make their own soap at home. The major uses for soap were in the household, for washing clothes and for toilet soap, and in textile manufacturing, particularly for fulling, cleansing, and scouring woolen stuffs. Because colonial America was rural, soap making remained widely dispersed, and no large producers emerged. By the eve of the American Revolution, however, the colonies had developed a minor export market; in 1770 they sent more than 86,000 pounds of soap worth ? ,165 to the West Indies. The Revolution interrupted this trade, and it never recovered. The growth of cities and the textile industry in the early nineteenth century increased soap usage and stimulated the rise of soap-making firms. By 1840, Cincinnati, then the largest meatpacking center in the United States, had become the leading soap-making city as well. The city boasted at least seventeen soap factories, including Procter and Gamble (established 1837), which was destined to become the nation’s dominant firm.

A major change in soap making occurred in the 1840s when manufacturers began to replace lye made from wood ashes with soda ash, a lye made through a chemical process. Almost all soap makers also produced tallow candles, which for many was their major business. The firms made soap in enormous slabs, and these were sold to grocers, who sliced the product like cheese for individual consumers. There were no brands, no advertising was directed at consumers, and most soap factories remained small before the Civil War. The period between the end of the Civil War and 1900 brought major changes to the soap industry.

The market for candles diminished sharply, and soap makers discontinued that business. At the same time, competition rose. Many soap makers began to brand their products and to introduce new varieties of toilet soap made with such exotic ingredients as palm oil and coconut oil. Advertising, at first modest but constantly increasing, became the major innovation. In 1893 Procter and Gamble spent $125,000 to promote Ivory soap, and by 1905 the sales budget for that product alone exceeded $400,000. Advertising proved amazingly effective.

In 1900 soap makers concentrated their advertising in newspapers but also advertised in streetcars and trains. Quick to recognize the communications revolution, the soap industry pioneered in radio advertising, particularly by developing daytime serial dramas. Procter and Gamble originated Ma Perkins, one of the earliest, most successful, and most long-lived of the genre that came to be known as Soap Operas, to advertise its Oxydol soap in 1933. By 1962 major soap firms spent approximately $250 million per year for advertising, of which 90 percent was television advertising.

In 1966, three out of the top five television advertisers were soap makers, and Procter and Gamble was television’s biggest sponsor, spending $161 million. Advertising put large soap makers at a competitive advantage, and by the late 1920s three firms had come to dominate the industry: (1) Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, incorporated as such in 1928 in New York State, although originally founded by William Colgate in 1807; (2) Lever Brothers, an English company that developed a full line of heavily advertised soaps in the nineteenth century and in 1897 and 1899 purchased factories in Boston and Philadelphia; and (3) Procter and Gamble.

Synthetic detergent, which was not a soap, but was made through a chemical synthesis that substituted fatty alcohols for animal fats, had been developed in Germany during World War I to alleviate a tallow shortage. Detergents are superior to soap in certain industrial processes, such as the making of textile finishes. They work better in hard water, and they eliminate the soap curd responsible for “bathtub rings. ” In 1933 Procter and Gamble introduced a pioneer detergent, Dreft, which targeted the dishwashing market because it was too light for laundering clothes.

It succeeded, especially in hard-water regions, until World War II interrupted detergent marketing. In 1940 the “big three”—Colgate, Lever, and Procter and Gamble—controlled about 75 percent of the soap and detergent market. They produced a wide variety of products, such as shampoos, dishwashing detergents, liquid cleaners, and toilet soap, but the most important part of their business was heavy-duty laundry soap, which accounted for about two-thirds of sales. Procter and Gamble had about 34 percent of the market. Lever was a close second with 30 percent, and Colgate trailed with 11 percent.

In 1946 Procter and Gamble radically shifted the balance in its favor when it introduced Tide, the first heavy-duty laundry detergent. By 1949, Tide had captured 25 percent of the laundry-detergent market. By 1956, even though Lever and Colgate had developed detergents of their own, Procter and Gamble held 57 percent of the market, as compared with 17 percent for Lever and 11 percent for Colgate. Despite Procter and Gamble’s triumph, the big three still competed fiercely. By 1972, detergents had almost eliminated soap from the laundry market, although toilet soap remained unchallenged by detergents.

In the 1970s, bans on detergents by some local governments, which feared contamination of their water supplies, had little impact on the composition or sales of laundry products. In the early 2000s, the smaller firms within the industry still produced a multitude of specialized cleansers for home and industry, although in the highly important fields of toilet soaps, laundry soaps, and detergents, the big three remained dominant, controlling about 80 percent of the total market. 3. 2 COMPANY PROFILE: Personal care or home care, Power Soaps has the magic touch that makes your life sparkle!

Quality products crafted innovatively and brought to you at prices youlove. HISTORY OF THE COMPANY: Moving ahead in the highly competitive FMCG industry is a daunting task. With MNCs with their multi-media advertising blitzkrieg on one hand & small scale manufactures on the other, a new entrant has it real tough. However, Power soap entered the Indian market in the 70’s & quickly grabbed a major chunk of the business. Thanks to the motto of producing quality products at reasonable price, it has become a beloved household name in Tamilnadu, Kerala, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh.

SPREADING OUR WINGS: Initially, the company produced detergent bars which became quite popular. After R. Krishna Nadar’s death, the company came under the leadership of his son K. Dhanapal who took it to newer heights and the company expanded. In 1998, detergent powder was introduced and this was an extremely successful venture too. Three more manufacturing units Power Soaps Limited at Puducherry, Abirami chemicals Puducherry and Praveen chem. Industry at Karaikal were added to meet the increasing demand for Power products.

Today the company has ventured into the personal care industry too, with hair care products like Nature Power range of shampoos and skin care products like the Nature Power range of beauty soaps and some other products like Clora Toothpaste, Laa Talc and Laa Fair Fairness cream. Aim / Vision / Mission: The Gold Company which produces the range of Power products had humble beginnings. It began with a single unit at Kodai Road, Dindigul Dist, and Tamilnadu. It was founded by Krishna Nadar who had a vision of producing a range of affordable detergent products without compromising on quality.

His business was built on the strong foundation of ethics and building enduring customer relationships. He had immense foresight that with the rapidly changing socio-cultural conditions and economy the market for hygiene and personal care products would grow. Nature has been a great source of inspiration and fresh fragrances like roses have been used in Power products. | QUALITY PROCESS/ POLICY: Power Soaps Limited has been certified with ISO 9001: 2000 by the International Certification Services for both manufacturing and supplying of detergent cakes, Powders, Toilet soaps and shampoos.

MANUFACTURING: Power Soaps has world class manufacturing facilities located at Sembiapalayam. Gummudipoondi, Periyapalayan, Silvassa and Karaikal. The entire production cycle from intake of raw, processing, manufacturing, quality checks and rollout of the product is carried out seamlessly. | INFRASTRUCUTRE:Power Soaps has always stayed at the forefront of technology, innovation and quality built on a backbone of a strong infrastructure. State-of-art technology and equipment are the norm at every plant.

Quality processes and the Best Practices ensure that what reaches each customer is world class quality at an affordable cost We have our own manufacturing plants at Sembiapalayam. Gummudipoondi, Periyapalayan, Silvassa and Karaikal. This allows us to control the quality and maintain the consistency of products. Our plants are manned by dedicated and efficient technical personnel with domain expertise who keep operations moving smoothly. | RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT: R&D is an ongoing initiative and we have a full-fledged centre.

A team works consistently to innovate and add value to the product line. Our products are driven by innovation and technology and it’s this trait that endears us to our customers and helps us deliver products that are a cut above the rest. Group companies: Power soft drink Pvt Ltd. , formerly Elajkikal soft drinks Chennai Pvt Ltd. , is situated at Padappai, 14kms from Tambaram in Tamilnadu. The company was formed under the guidance of experienced personnel’s and the Primary aim of the company is to be synonymous with quality. Dice a refreshing mango drink is a product of Power Soft drinks.

Made from pure mango pulp this drink has the goodness of mango in every sip. Now available in 300ml packs and in pet bottles. Apart from fruit juices, the company has extended its range to include soft drinks and aerated water. It has state-of-technology for manufacturing and packaging. The brand ‘2day’ is gaining popularity and will soon becoming a household name for soft drinks. 2day comes in three different flavours in Cola, Lime, and Orange. Priced for the mid market, 2day is truly a value for money drink. Hello Chennai Water Pvt. Ltd. a fast growing brand of mineral water trusted by WHO (World Health Organization) and is certified by the ISI. Hello has a state –of-the- art plant at Chennai where Hello Aqua Mineral is hygienically processed through 5unique stages. The treated water is scrutinized for quality at the in-built hi- tech microbiological lab. Once the quality tests are passed, the water is passed; the water is packed in polycarbonate bottles- the material used to manufacture feeding bottles, and sealed with a tamper-proof seal. Besides, these sturdy bottles are shatterproof and spill-proof.

Hello offers packaged water in convenient and sleek options of 20 lts and25 lts, which can be fitted to a transi-jar besides stand-alone hot and cold dispenser units. RKN AQUA product manufactures Nature Power drinking water. Move on to a healthier lifestyle! Consumption of impure, unsafe water is the pivotal cause of some of the worlds severs diseases. Don’t put your family’s health at stake by going for just any brand of drinking water. Show your family you care- choose refreshingly safe Nature Power drinking water, sourced from natural underground reservoirs.

Safe because it goes through a sophisticated 5-stage purifier process. Safe…. because it is trusted and certified by the ISI. Purity, hygine and health at affordable prices! NETWORK This enables them to deliver product quickly and at competitive rate at any part of India. Power soap Ltd. , has manufacturing units (Puducherry, Karaikal, Silvasa, Gummudipoondi) and marketing units (Mumbai, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Palakad, Nagore, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh). N&D Communication Chennai, Vinodam AD Erode advertisement agency. 300 Distributors in total Tamilnadu.

PROFILE OF THE ORGANISATION Name: Power Soaps Limited Founder: Mr. Krishna Nadar Chief Executive Officer: Mr. K. Dhanapal General Manager: Mr. Sanjay Madan Registered Office: 62 B, North Bogh Road, T Nagar, Chennai Owning Company: Power Soaps Ltd, Puducherry Company Category: Private Limited Major Market : Indian subcontinent, East Asia, Middle East and South East Asia Website: www. powersoap. com Telephone Number: 0413-2665226 Bankers: TMB, IOB, Axis, HDFC. | Power Soaps is a household name in the detergent and bathing soap segment in South India.

The brand stands proud as a triumph of entrepreneurial spirit, vision and a customer-centric business. | Home Care| Take the modern approach to cleaning your clothes and dishes. Power Soaps offers a wide range of detergents for clothes and dishes formulated with the latest technology to leave them clean and sparkling. | Personal Care| Pamper your hair and skin with the exquisite range of soaps and shampoos from Power. Manufactured from fine ingredients they leave you with glowing skin, hair and an enchanting fragrance. | | | | Power Soaps is a household name in the detergent and bathing soap segment in South India.

The brand stands proud as a triumph of entrepreneurial spirit, vision and a customer-centric business. A Dream Unfolds Started in the 1970’s, Power Soaps was established as the Gold Company and operated with a single unit at Kodai Road, Dindigul Dist, Tamilnadu. It was founded by Krishna Nadar, a visionary entrepreneur who believed that there existed a great demand for quality yet affordable detergent soaps. His sharp business acumen and astute strategies paved the way for the rapid growth of the brand. He built the business on the strong foundation of ethics and building enduring customer relationships| |

Moving to the next level. After R Krishnan Nadar’s regime, the mantle was taken over by his son K. Dhanapal who took it to newer heights and the company expanded. In 1998, detergent powder was introduced and this was an extremely successful venture too. Three more manufacturing units Power Soaps Limited at Puducherry, Abirami Chemicals Pondicherry and Praveen Chem Industry at Karaikal were added to meet the increasing demand for Power products. The growth spurt. The consistent success of the company inspired it to diversify into various segments.

It ventured into the personal care industry too, with hair care products like the Nature Power range of shampoos and skin care products like the Nature Power range of beauty soaps, Clora Toothpaste, Laa Talc and LaaFair Fairnesscream. The company also diversified into the soft drink market with Powersoft Drinks Pvt Ltd. , formerly Elanjikal Soft Drinks Chennai Pvt. Ltd. , at Padappai, 14 kms from Tambaram in Tamil Nadu. The Mango Dice brand was manufactured here. Hello Water and Power Water mineral water brands were also introduced. Taking on a New Identity

The next step was to consolidate all brands under one umbrella and this was done through creating the Power Soaps identity. This created a leap in brand value and image. Later, Power exited the soft drink and water business to sharpen the focus on detergents and personal care. Powering Today’s World Power Soaps with its huge bouquet of detergent and personal care brands has a huge presence across South India and exports to countries like the Gulf. The quality products have been appreciated by customers making it a household name. The brands are backed by a strong manufacturing infrastructure with plants in Sembiapalayam.

Gummudipoondi, Periyapalayan, Silvassa and Karaikal Power Jumbo| Home Care :: Detergent Cake :: Tyko| | Variants: | Power Jumbo – Blue Power Jumbo Blue has strong stain fighting agents that penetrate well into the fabric and eliminate dirt and grime with powerful action. This leaves your clotheslooking fresh with a pleasant fragrance. Keeps colours bright.. Available in convenient sizes of 125gms, 200 gms, 250 gms, 300 gms| Power Jumbo – Yellow Power Jumbo Yellow has a sunny citrus cleansing agent that works its way deep into fabrics and cleans them.

Keeps colours bright and leaves a lingering fragrance on clothes. Available in convenient sizes of 125gms, 200 gms, 250 gms, 300 gms| | | Power jumbo pink Power Jumbo Pink is the colour of perfect health. The ideal way to keep your clothes free from germs and dirt. Leaves clothes with a plesant fragrance.. Available in convenient sizes of 125gms, 200 gms, 250 gms, 300 gms| | | | Nature Power Beauty SoapPersonal Care , Skin Care , Nature Power Beauty Soap| | | : | Nature Power Beauty Soap – Lime

A dash of lime is the perfect way to perk up your day. This fresh fragrance keeps your skin clean, healthy and refreshed. Perfect to give your skin the perfect pick-me-up. Available in 150gms, 100gms and 75gms. | Nature Power Beauty Soap – Rose The rich fragrance of roses makes you feel like royalty every time you bathe. This beauty soap uses exotic ingredients with a luxurious feel to give you gorgeous skin 24×7. Available in 150gms, 100gms and 75gms. | | | Nature Power Beauty Soap – Sandal Sandal has been the choice of the rich and royalty for many centuries.

Indulge in this exquisite fragrance every time you bathe. Keeps skin healthy and glowing naturally. Available in 150gms, 100gms and 75gms. | Nature Power Beauty Soap – Lavender Gentle Lavender brings you the romance of the English countryside. Let the lovely feeling envelop you every time you shower. Watch your skin turn healthy, super-soft and beautiful. Available in 150gms, 100gms and 75gms. | | | Nature Power Beauty Soap – Herbal Unleash the potential of 21 rare herbs to rejuvenate and revitalize your skin. This revives tired skin and leaves it healthy and supple.

A boon for stressed out skin. Available in 150gms, 100gms and 75gms| | | | | | | CHAPTER IV DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION S. NO| AGE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| <20 YRS| 0| 0| 2| 21-25 YRS| 15| 30| 3| 26-35 YRS| 23| 46| 4| 36-50 YRS| 12| 24| 5| >50 YRS| 0| 0| TABLE 4. 1: AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS Source: Primary data CHART 4. 1. 1: AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 46% of the respondents are of the age between 26-35yrs and 24% of respondents are of the age between 36-50yrs and 30% of the respondents are of the age between 21-25 yrs.

TABLE 4. 2: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WORKING S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 5| 10%| 4| Satisfied| 26| 52%| 5| Highly satisfied| 19| 38%| FACILITIES Source: Primary data CHART 4. 2. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WORKING FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 52% of the respondents are satisfied with the working facilities and 0% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the working facilities provide by the organization. S. NO| GRADE| NO.

OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 5| 10%| 4| Satisfied| 28| 56%| 5| Highly satisfied| 17| 34%| TABLE 4. 3: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS SANITARY FACILITIES Source: Primary data CHART4. 3. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS SANITARY FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 56% of the respondent are satisfied with the sanitary facilities and 0% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the sanitary facilities provided by the organization. TABLE 4. 4: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS HYGIENIC

S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 17| 34%| 2| Dissatisfied| 31| 62%| 3| Average| 2| 4%| 4| Satisfied| 0| 0| 5| Highly satisfied| 0| 0| CONDITIONS Source: Primary data CHART 4. 4. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS HYGIENIC CONDITIONS INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 62% of the respondents are satisfied with the hygienic conditions and 10% of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the hygienic conditions in the organization. TABLE 4. 5: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS MEDICAL FACILITIES S.

NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 11| 22%| 4| Satisfied| 26| 52%| 5| Highly Satisfied| 11| 26%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 5. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS MEDICAL FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 52% of the respondents are satisfied with the medical facilities and 22% of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the medical facilities provided by the organization. TABLE 4. 6: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS TRANSPORT FACILITIES S.

NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 33| 66%| 4| Satisfied| 17| 34%| 5| Highly Satisfied| 0| 0%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 6. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS TRANSPORT FACILITIES INFERENCE : From the above table it is inferred that 34% of the respondents are satisfied with the transport facilities and 66% of them are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the transport facilities provided by the organization. TABLE 4. 7: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WORK TIMINGS S. NO| GRADE| NO.

OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 26| 52%| 4| Satisfied| 22| 44%| 5| Highly Satisfied| 2| 4%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 7. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WORK TIMINGS INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 44% of the respondents are satisfied with the work timings and 52% of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the work timings in the organization. TABLE 4. 8: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WASHING FACILITIES S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| | Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 22| 44%| 4| Satisfied| 23| 46%| 5| Highly satisfied| 5| 10%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 8. 1: LEVEL OF SATISFACTION TOWARDS WASHING FACILITIES INFERENCE : From the above table it is inferred that 46% of the respondents are satisfied with the washing facilities and 44% of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the washing facilities in the organization. TABLE 4. 9: OPINION TOWARDS DRINKING WATER FACILITIES S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| | Strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disagree| 0| 0%| 3| Neutral| 5| 10%| 4| Agree| 27| 54%| 5| Strongly agree| 18| 36%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 9. 1: OPINION TOWARDS DRINKING WATER FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 54%of the respondents agree that the adequate drinking water facilities are provided and 10% of the respondents neither agree nor disagree with the drinking water facilities provided by the organization. TABLE 4. 10: OPINION TOWARDS THE HEALTH INSURANCE AND S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| | Strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disgree| 0| 0%| 3| Neutral| 27| 54%| 4| Agree| 23| 46%| 5| Strongly agree| 0| 0| ACCIDENT BENEFITS Source: Primary data CHART 4. 10. 1: OPINION TOWARDS THE HEALTH INSURANCE AND ACCIDENT BENEFITS INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 46% of the respondents agree health insurance and accident benefits and 54% of the respondents neither agree nor disagree to the health insurance and accident benefits provided by the organization. TABLE 4. 11: OPINION TOWARDS FIRST AID S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| | Strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disagree| 0| 0%| 3| Neutral| 20| 40%| 4| agree| 23| 46%| 5| strongly agree| 7| 14%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 11. 1: OPINION TOWARDS FIRST AID INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 46% of the respondents agree that adequate importance is given to the first aid facilities and 40% of the respondents neither agree nor disagree about the first aid facilities. TABLE 4. 12. 1: OPINION TOWARDS CANTEEN FACILITIES S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disagree| 0| 0%| | Neutral| 33| 66%| 4| agree| 17| 34%| 5| strongly agree| 0| 0%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 12. 1: OPINION TOWARDS CANTEEN FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 66% of the respondents agree that they are satisfied with the canteen facilities and the res 34 % neither agree nor disagree with the canteen facilities in the organization. TABLE 4. 13: OPINION TOWARDS THE MEDICAL SERVICES PROVIDED DURING EMERGENCIES S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disagree| 0| 0%| 3| Neutral| 18| 36%| | agree| 24| 48%| 5| strongly agree| 8| 16%| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 13. 1: OPINION TOWARDS THE MEDICAL SERVICES PROVIDED DURING EMERGENCIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 48% of the respondents agree that the proper medical services are provided during emergencies and 36% of the respondents neither agree nor disagree. TABLE 14: OPINION TOWARDS LEAVE FACILITIES S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| strongly disagree| 0| 0%| 2| Disagree| 0| 0%| 3| Neutral| 29| 58%| 4| agree| 20| 40%| 5| Strongly agree| 1| 2%|

Source: Primary data CHART 14: OPINION TOWARDS LEAVE FACILITIES INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 40% of the respondents agree that the leave facilities are provided according to statutory provisions and 58% of the respondents neither agree nor disagree to this. TABLE 4. 15: OVERALL SATISFACTION LEVEL S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Dissatisfied| 0| 0%| 3| Average| 13| 26%| 4| Satisfied| 37| 74%| 5| Highly satisfied| 0| 0| Source: Primary data CHART 4. 15. 1: OVERALL SATISFACTION LEVEL

INFERENCE: From the above table it is inferred that 74% of the respondents are satisfied with the total welfare amenities and 26% of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the total welfare amenities provided by the organization. 4. 16 CORRELATION METHOD Analysis of opinion regarding relationship between the age of the respondents and level of overall satisfaction with the amenities provided by the organization. S. NO| Age| No. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| <20 YRS| 0| 0| 2| 21-25 YRS| 15| 30| 3| 26-35 YRS| 23| 46| | 36-50 YRS| 12| 24| 5| >50 YRS| 0| 0| AGE GROUP OF THE RESPONDENTS: OVERALL SATISFACTION LEVEL : S. NO| GRADE| NO. OF RESPONDENTS| PERCENTAGE| 1| Highly satisfied| 0| 0%| 2| Satisfied| 37| 74%| 3| Average| 13| 26%| 4| Dissatisfied| 0| 0| 5| Highly dissatisfied| 0| 0| CORRELATIONS VARIABLES| x| y| dx| dy| dxdy| dx2| dy2| 1| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 2| 15| 37| -120| 888| -106560| 14400| 788544| 3| 23| 13| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 4| 12| 0| -132| 0| 0| 17424| 0| 5| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| TOTAL| 50| 50| -252| 898| -106560| 31824| 788544| r = ? dxdy ?dx2 ? dy = -106560 5094624256 =-0. 67 INFERENCE: From the analysis it is found that the age of the respondents and the designation of the respondents are negatively correlated. 4. 17 CHI SQUARE Analysis of opinion of the respondents regarding association between the age group of the respondents and working facilities. Null Hypothesis(H0): There is no association between the age group of the respondents and working facilities. Alternative Hypothesis(H1): There is an association between the age group of the respondents and working facilities.

Observed frequency: OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly dissatisfied| 0| 19| 19| Dissatisfied| 15| 26| 41| Average| 23| 5| 28| Satisfied| 12| 0| 12| Highly satisfied| 0| 0| 0| Total| 50| 50| 100| Expected Frequency: OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly dissatisfied| 9. 5| 9. 5| 19| Dissatisfied| 20. 5| 20. 5| 41| Average| 1| 14| 28| Satisfied| 6| 6| 12| Highly satisfied| 0| 0| 0| Total| 50| 50| 100| O| E| O-E| (O-E)2| (O-E)2/E| 0| 9. 5| -9. 5| 90. 25| 9. 5| 15| 20. 5| 5. 5| 30. 25| 1. 47| 23| 14| 9| 81| 5. 78| 12| 6| 6| 36| 6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 19| 9. 5| 9. 5| 90. 25| 9. | 26| 20. 5| 5. 5| 30. 25| 1. 47| 5| 14| 9| 81| 5. 78| 0| 6| -6| 36| 6| 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| | | | | 45. 5| Degrees of freedom= (r-1) (c-1) = (5-1) (2-1) = 4 INFERENCE: The table value of 5% at 4 degrees of freedom is 9. 488 which is less than the calculated value. Hence Ha is accepted. Ha : There is an association between the Age of the respondent and working facilities provided by the organization. 4. 17. 1 CHI-SQUARE Analysis of opinion of the respondents regarding association between the qualification of the and the work timings. Null hypothesis(H0) :

There is no association between the qualification of the respondents and their work timings. Alternate Hypothesis(Ha): There is no association between the qualification of the respondents and their work timings. Observed Frequency: OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly dissatisfied| 0| 2| 2| Dissatisfied| 12| 22| 34| Average| 15| 26| 41| Satisfied| 18| 0| 18| Highly satisfied| 5| 0| 5| TOTAL| 50| 50| 100| Expected Frequency: OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly satisfied| 1| 1| 2| Satisfied| 17| 17| 34| Average| 20. 5| 20. 5| 41| Dissatisfied| 9| 9| 18| Highly Dissatisfied| 2. 5| 2. 5| 5|

TOTAL| 50| 50| 100| O| E| O-E| (O-E)2| (O-E)2/E| 0| 1| -1| 1| 1| 12| 17| -5| 25| 1. 47| 15| 20. 5| -5. 5| 30. 25| 1. 48| 18| 9| 9| 81| 9| 5| 2. 5| -2. 5| 6. 25| 2. 5| 2| 1| 1| 1| 1| 22| 17| -5| 25| 1. 47| 26| 20. 5| -5. 5| 30. 5| 1. 48| 0| 9| 9| 81| 9| 0| 2. 5| -2. 5| 6. 25| 2. 5| | | | | 30. 9| Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) = (5-1) (2-1) = 4 INFERENCE The table value of 5% at 4 degrees of freedom is 9. 488 which is less than the calculated value. Hence Ha is accepted. Ha : There is an association between the qualification of the respondents and the work timings. 4. 17. 2 CHI-SQUARE

Analysis of opinion of the respondents regarding association between the designation of the and the hygienic conditions in the work place Null hypothesis(H0) : There is no association between the qualification of the respondents and their work timings. Alternate Hypothesis(Ha): There is no association between the qualification of the respondents and their work timings. Observed Frequency: OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly dissatisfied| 4| 17| 21| Dissatisfied| 5| 31| 36| Average| 5| 2| 7| Satisfied| 16| 0| 16| Highly satisfied| 29| 0| 20| TOTAL| 50| 50| 100| Expected Frequency:

OPINION| X| Y| TOTAL| Highly dissatisfied| 10. 5| 10. 5| 21| Dissatisfied| 18| 18| 36| Average| 3. 5| 3. 5| 7| Satisfied| 8| 8| 16| Highly satisfied| 10| 10| 20| TOTAL| 50| 50| 100| O| E| O-E| (O-E)2| (O-E)2/E| 17| 10. 5| 6. 5| 42. 25| 4. 023| 31| 18| 13| 169| 9. 38| 2| 3. 5| 1. 5| 2. 25| 0. 64| 0| 8| -8| 64| 8| 0| 0| -10| 100| 10| 4| 10. 5| -6. 5| 42. 25| 4. 023| 5| 18| 13| 169| 9. 38| 5| 3. 5| 1. 5| 2. 25| 0. 64| 16| 8| 8| 64| 8| 20| 0| 10| 100| 10| | | | | 64. 086| Degrees of freedom = (r-1) (c-1) = (5-1) (2-1) = 4 INFERENCE: The table value of 5% at 4 degrees of freedom is 9. 88 which is less than the calculated value. Hence Ha is accepted. Ha: There is an association between the designations of the respondents and the hygienic conditions in the work place. CHAPTER V Findings: 1. Most of the respondents are of age group between 26-35 yrs. 2. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with the working facilities and few of the employees are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied. 3. Most of the respondent are satisfied with the sanitary facilities and only a few of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied. with the sanitary facilities provided by the organization. . Majority of the respondents are satisfied with the hygienic conditions and only a few of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the hygienic conditions in the organization. 5. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with the medical facilities and very few of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the medical facilities provided by the organization. 6. A few of the respondents are satisfied with the transport facilities and majority of them are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the transport facilities provided by the organization. . Very few of the respondents are satisfied with the work timings and majority of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the work timings in the organization. 8. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with the washing facilities and few of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the washing facilities in the organization. 9. Majority of the respondents agree that the adequate drinking water facilities are provided and very few of the respondents neither agree nor disagree with the drinking water facilities provided by the organization. 10.

Very few of the respondents agree health insurance and accident benefits and majority of the respondents neither agree nor disagree to the health insurance and accident benefits provided by the organization. 11. From the analysis it is found that the age of the respondents and the designation of the respondents are negatively correlated. 12. From the analysis it was found that there is an association between the Age of the respondent and working facilities provided by the organization. 13. From the analysis it was found that there is an association between the qualification of the respondents and the work timings. 4. From the analysis it was found that there is an association between the designations of the respondents and the hygienic conditions in the work place. 4. 2 SUGGESTIONS * The responses of the employees regarding the level of satisfaction of welfare measures are in the satisfactory region * Since 66% of the employees are not satisfied with the transport facilities provided by the company, steps may be taken to provide facilities especially for the employees who have to work during night. The conditions of the rest rooms and shelters may be improved . they may be provided with adequate fans and facilities to rest. * The health insurance and accidents benefits should be improved so as to give the employees may have a secured feeling . * The canteen facilities should be improved in such a way that the employees get the food based on their preferences. This would be helpful for those who are bachelors. * From the study it was also identified that only a few employees are having satisfaction towards the leave facilities.

This facility should be provided and improved so that it would help the employee during emergency. CONCLUSION The study was conducted in POWER SOAPS LTD is the soaps and detergent manufacturing company which is located at Puducherry . The study enabled the researcher to know how the welfare measure can be improved and what steps should be taken for the improvement. It has been found after visiting the spots and places related with welfare facilities the statutory conditions according to the factories act 1948 are fulfilled in welfare activities.

Most of the employees are satisfied with the welfare facilities and most of the employees are well aware with the measures activity. The company takes good care of its employees. With available information I suggest that the company should further reduce the bad opinions about the facilities provided. Welfare facilities should be improved not only to increase the productivity but also increase the standard of living of the employees. Hope the company consider these suggestion and pay more attention for further improvement

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