Experience of Having a Baby

1 January 2017

The experience of having a baby was hardly any trip to the beach, but can be described as a wavelike effect. The feelings and emotions came and went, for what felt like eternity. It all began the moment I found out that I was pregnant. I had mixed feelings about having a baby because I felt I wasn’t ready and too young. I would soon learn that a baby would come whether I was ready or not. In the beginning I was sick for the first four months. I wasn’t able to eat anything. It was like my stomach refused everything I ingest and threw it back at me.

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I couldn’t brush my teeth, eat my favorite foods, I even felt sick to my stomach at the smell of certain people. I literally had no energy to do anything. I was weak and became very grouchy. A person cannot truly understand all that a woman endures having a baby, unless you experience it for yourself. My first doctor’s appointment was very captivating; I asked many questions and got a full preview of the feast that seemed too big for me to finish. My doctor explained the process and stages of the pregnancy and what the start of labor would feel like. It all made sense once I reached my fifth month.

I started to feel movement in my pelvic area. It felt like my skin was crawling and my organs were shifting positions. It was strange and kind of exciting to know that what you are feeling is another human moving and existing inside of you. My hand stayed on my stomach all day hoping to feel this person I’ll soon meet. I got to know my baby before I met her. I learned when the baby slept, when she was awake, what she liked and disliked. I even was able to see my stomach shift and move from one side to the other. At times my stomach got hard when the baby was towards the front and soft when the baby was more towards my butt.

I began to urinate a lot. My bladder was a waterfall that flowed constantly. Every normal task became more uncomfortable. I couldn’t sleep or walk. Trying to find a comfortable position to sleep in was like trying to rotate a heavy piece of equipment. I turned all night. Every stride I took was as if I was in slow motion, I was moving but not going fast enough. My stomach looked like it had swallowed a small basketball. My eyes started to look sunken in and my nose grew bigger. I began to feel small painful cramps and tightening that started at the top of my uterus and radiated downward into my back.

It felt something similar to gas pains times one thousand. The doctor said these were called “Braxton-Hicks contractions, samples of what contractions would feel like. Each time I would have one, the bathtub became more of my friend. It was so soothing and warm. It was relaxing and made me want to sleep. Hot water does the body good. Once I entered my eight month, the pains became more frequent and a little more intense. I was no longer having feelings of gas pains; they were more like strong menstrual cramps with charley horses in my lower back. I was going into false labor which landed me into the hospital.

It was too early to deliver. At the end of my eight month I had dilated 2 centimeters. Now it’s February and I’m into my ninth month. I began early labor. Contractions became more frequent. They would come every ten minutes and last 30 seconds each. Within one week of my due date, my mucus plug came out. It was a mucusy vaginal discharge that tinged with a bloody show. February 6th I went into labor. I was up all night trying to time the contractions. They became longer, stronger and closer together. They were coming every five minutes lasting 60 seconds each. The pain became a silent killer. I couldn’t breathe, sleep or concentrate.

About 3:30pm, while I was trying to catch a nap, I was awakened by a sharp pain that felt like someone was squeezing my insides as hard as they could, and I noticed my pants was wet. I thought I urinated on myself, but it was just that my water had finally broken. I called my doctor and she told me to go to the hospital. The contractions became overwhelmingly intense, like a 400 pound man was pressing down on both of my hips. I started to have rectal pains with each contraction. By the time I got to the hospital, I was so exhausted from being up all night and dealing with the pain that I couldn’t even walk.

My husband had to get me a wheelchair and complete all necessary paperwork for admissions. Once that was done, the nurse took some blood, inserted an I. V. and took me straight to the maternity floor and put me in the birthing room that I would deliver in. She gave me a gown that had the back out and breast pockets that came apart for nursing the baby and a cup to urinate in. My husband helped me into the gown and helped me sit on toilet. Once I began urinating, I started to feel extreme pressure in my rectum. It felt like I had to have a bowel movement.

The nurse told me that my body wants to push but advised me not to, so my husband and the nurse helped me in the bed. At this point, I thought finally, this baby was about to come. We were so excited! The nurse took my temperature, pulse, blood pressure and hooked an electronic fetal monitor around my belly to monitor the baby’s heartbeat. She did a pelvic exam to check my cervix for dilation and thinning and to feel how low the baby was. This was very painful because she did this periodically while I was having a contraction. I had only dilated 4 centimeters. The excitement of having this baby had faded.

I thought I was going to coming in here, have a baby and be done. That was a joke! The baby fell asleep and so did I. I started to feel that this baby was never going to come. It seemed like one minute I’m sleeping and the next being awakened by 50 knives in my pelvic. I thought I was going to die. I grabbed the side rails so hard and tight that I couldn’t breathe. The nurse noticed me struggling to breathe while having a contraction and suggested she give me Demerol to help me manage the pain. I agreed. Once the medicine went through my system, I felt like I was walking on clouds.

It seemed like hours had passed and the clock was waiting on me because between every contraction for the next hour or so I passed out from all the pain and exhaustion. The doctor came in to check me for dilation, but I had only dilated 6 centimeters. The doctor said just a little while longer. It seemed like I was a battlefield and my body was in combat. The contractions were coming in waves, each one getting more intense, making me speechless. I couldn’t even complete a sentence before the next one would come. This was the most difficult experience of my life. Suddenly I felt a spasm from what seemed like my bottom.

My first thought was that I was going to poop on myself. I started to feel an intense wanting to push. It was like my legs were going numb. My husband and the nurse noticed a sudden change in my expression and decided it was time to check me again to see how far I’ve dilated, so she began to adjust my bed, then went and got the doctor. The doctor came in and found that not only was I dilated 10 centimeters but she could feel the baby’s head. Finally, I’m in position, knees up to my cheeks, husband on the left, and mom on the right, doctor where she should be, and my eyes closed. There was a sudden silence in the room.

The only people I heard were my husband, mother and the doctor. The doctor said push and I held my breath and pushed as hard as I could about five times. My doctor asked my husband if he wanted to look at the baby’s head. I felt his head shake no, a lot. The nurse saw he was woozy and told him to take a seat because he looked like he was going to faint. All eyes turned towards him. He said no. My mom said she wanted to see, so mom and the nurse shifted positions. Mom got behind the doctor and the nurse took my right leg. I pushed two more sets of five. I never made one sound. I was concentrating too hard on getting that baby out!

I did reach a point where I was so tired and exhausted from pushing that my strength began to diminish. The doctor knew I needed a little help so she said I had three more pushes, and she would help with the vacuum. I grew kind of scared because I thought the vacuum would mess up the baby, with its brain being stretched. Before I had time to ask a question, a contraction came. I mustered up enough strength I didn’t know I had, and I pushed with all the might. On that second vacuum-assisted push, our little girl came into the world. I screamed so loud and my head fell back on the pillow.

I must have startled the baby because she began screaming too. As soon as the baby screamed, about 10 of my family members came running in. I was all exposed; legs wide open, bloody, looking a hot mess. It was a mass chaos! I yelled and told them to get out! At that point the doctor asked my husband if he wanted to cut the cord and he said yes. This was a proud moment for my husband. When I look back on the moment I held my daughter in my arms for the first time, looking in her innocent eyes, I instantly fell in love. I often wonder how something so small can cause a woman so much pain at the same time.

My whole body was in a severe thunderstorm and struck by lightning fifty times over, but I survived the storm and now enjoying the beach and the endless wave-like experiences with the sunshine of my life. The Experience Having a Baby The experience of having a baby was hardly any trip to the beach, but can be described as a wavelike effect. The feelings and emotions came and went, for what felt like eternity. It all began the moment I found out that I was pregnant. I had mixed feelings about having a baby because I felt I wasn’t ready and too young. I would soon learn that a baby would come whether I was ready or not.

In the beginning I was sick for the first four months. I wasn’t able to eat anything. It was like my stomach refused everything I ingest and threw it back at me. I couldn’t brush my teeth, eat my favorite foods, I even felt sick to my stomach at the smell of certain people. I literally had no energy to do anything. I was weak and became very grouchy. A person cannot truly understand all that a woman endures having a baby, unless you experience it for yourself. My first doctor’s appointment was very captivating; I asked many questions and got a full preview of the feast that seemed too big for me to finish.

My doctor explained the process and stages of the pregnancy and what the start of labor would feel like. It all made sense once I reached my fifth month. I started to feel movement in my pelvic area. It felt like my skin was crawling and my organs were shifting positions. It was strange and kind of exciting to know that what you are feeling is another human moving and existing inside of you. My hand stayed on my stomach all day hoping to feel this person I’ll soon meet. I got to know my baby before I met her. I learned when the baby slept, when she was awake, what she liked and disliked.

I even was able to see my stomach shift and move from one side to the other. At times my stomach got hard when the baby was towards the front and soft when the baby was more towards my butt. I began to urinate a lot. My bladder was a waterfall that flowed constantly. Every normal task became more uncomfortable. I couldn’t sleep or walk. Trying to find a comfortable position to sleep in was like trying to rotate a heavy piece of equipment. I turned all night. Every stride I took was as if I was in slow motion, I was moving but not going fast enough.

My stomach looked like it had swallowed a small basketball. My eyes started to look sunken in and my nose grew bigger. I began to feel small painful cramps and tightening that started at the top of my uterus and radiated downward into my back. It felt something similar to gas pains times one thousand. The doctor said these were called “Braxton-Hicks contractions, samples of what contractions would feel like. Each time I would have one, the bathtub became more of my friend. It was so soothing and warm. It was relaxing and made me want to sleep. Hot water does the body good.

Once I entered my eight month, the pains became more frequent and a little more intense. I was no longer having feelings of gas pains; they were more like strong menstrual cramps with charley horses in my lower back. I was going into false labor which landed me into the hospital. It was too early to deliver. At the end of my eight month I had dilated 2 centimeters. Now it’s February and I’m into my ninth month. I began early labor. Contractions became more frequent. They would come every ten minutes and last 30 seconds each. Within one week of my due date, my mucus plug came out.

It was a mucusy vaginal discharge that tinged with a bloody show. February 6th I went into labor. I was up all night trying to time the contractions. They became longer, stronger and closer together. They were coming every five minutes lasting 60 seconds each. The pain became a silent killer. I couldn’t breathe, sleep or concentrate. About 3:30pm, while I was trying to catch a nap, I was awakened by a sharp pain that felt like someone was squeezing my insides as hard as they could, and I noticed my pants was wet. I thought I urinated on myself, but it was just that my water had finally broken.

I called my doctor and she told me to go to the hospital. The contractions became overwhelmingly intense, like a 400 pound man was pressing down on both of my hips. I started to have rectal pains with each contraction. By the time I got to the hospital, I was so exhausted from being up all night and dealing with the pain that I couldn’t even walk. My husband had to get me a wheelchair and complete all necessary paperwork for admissions. Once that was done, the nurse took some blood, inserted an I. V. and took me straight to the maternity floor and put me in the birthing room that I would deliver in.

She gave me a gown that had the back out and breast pockets that came apart for nursing the baby and a cup to urinate in. My husband helped me into the gown and helped me sit on toilet. Once I began urinating, I started to feel extreme pressure in my rectum. It felt like I had to have a bowel movement. The nurse told me that my body wants to push but advised me not to, so my husband and the nurse helped me in the bed. At this point, I thought finally, this baby was about to come. We were so excited! The nurse took my temperature, pulse, blood pressure and hooked an electronic fetal monitor around my belly to monitor the baby’s heartbeat.

She did a pelvic exam to check my cervix for dilation and thinning and to feel how low the baby was. This was very painful because she did this periodically while I was having a contraction. I had only dilated 4 centimeters. The excitement of having this baby had faded. I thought I was going to coming in here, have a baby and be done. That was a joke! The baby fell asleep and so did I. I started to feel that this baby was never going to come. It seemed like one minute I’m sleeping and the next being awakened by 50 knives in my pelvic. I thought I was going to die. I grabbed the side rails so hard and tight that I couldn’t breathe.

The nurse noticed me struggling to breathe while having a contraction and suggested she give me Demerol to help me manage the pain. I agreed. Once the medicine went through my system, I felt like I was walking on clouds. It seemed like hours had passed and the clock was waiting on me because between every contraction for the next hour or so I passed out from all the pain and exhaustion. The doctor came in to check me for dilation, but I had only dilated 6 centimeters. The doctor said just a little while longer. It seemed like I was a battlefield and my body was in combat.

The contractions were coming in waves, each one getting more intense, making me speechless. I couldn’t even complete a sentence before the next one would come. This was the most difficult experience of my life. Suddenly I felt a spasm from what seemed like my bottom. My first thought was that I was going to poop on myself. I started to feel an intense wanting to push. It was like my legs were going numb. My husband and the nurse noticed a sudden change in my expression and decided it was time to check me again to see how far I’ve dilated, so she began to adjust my bed, then went and got the doctor.

The doctor came in and found that not only was I dilated 10 centimeters but she could feel the baby’s head. Finally, I’m in position, knees up to my cheeks, husband on the left, and mom on the right, doctor where she should be, and my eyes closed. There was a sudden silence in the room. The only people I heard were my husband, mother and the doctor. The doctor said push and I held my breath and pushed as hard as I could about five times. My doctor asked my husband if he wanted to look at the baby’s head. I felt his head shake no, a lot.

The nurse saw he was woozy and told him to take a seat because he looked like he was going to faint. All eyes turned towards him. He said no. My mom said she wanted to see, so mom and the nurse shifted positions. Mom got behind the doctor and the nurse took my right leg. I pushed two more sets of five. I never made one sound. I was concentrating too hard on getting that baby out! I did reach a point where I was so tired and exhausted from pushing that my strength began to diminish. The doctor knew I needed a little help so she said I had three more pushes, and she would help with the vacuum.

I grew kind of scared because I thought the vacuum would mess up the baby, with its brain being stretched. Before I had time to ask a question, a contraction came. I mustered up enough strength I didn’t know I had, and I pushed with all the might. On that second vacuum-assisted push, our little girl came into the world. I screamed so loud and my head fell back on the pillow. I must have startled the baby because she began screaming too. As soon as the baby screamed, about 10 of my family members came running in. I was all exposed; legs wide open, bloody, looking a hot mess. It was a mass chaos!

I yelled and told them to get out! At that point the doctor asked my husband if he wanted to cut the cord and he said yes. This was a proud moment for my husband. When I look back on the moment I held my daughter in my arms for the first time, looking in her innocent eyes, I instantly fell in love. I often wonder how something so small can cause a woman so much pain at the same time. My whole body was in a severe thunderstorm and struck by lightning fifty times over, but I survived the storm and now enjoying the beach and the endless wave-like experiences with the sunshine of my life.

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