Honour Killing

HONOR KILLING| | What is Honour Killing? * An honour killing (also called a customary killing) happens when a person is murdered by a family member out of the belief or suspicion that the victim has brought shame to the family, clan or community. Murdering the person is believed to salvage the family’s honour. * An honor killing or honour killing(also called a customary killing) is the killing of a member of a family or social group by other members, due to the belief of the perpetrators that the victim has brought dishonour upon the family or community.

Honour killings are directed mostly against women and girls. About Honour Killing:- “Honour killings” or horror killings — call them by any name, they are just one of many crimes born out of unholy traditions which survive on the blood of the innocent. Ironically, any law, no matter how severe it is, will be able to check these crimes. The reason: MINDSET. Cemented over the centuries by the feudal and patriarchal set-up, changing the mindset of the population today is tougher than the toughest thing is the world.

A law might ban khap panchayats or at the most make “honour killing”, a non-bailable offence punishable with death penalty. But “honour killing” will continue to prevail till we convince people, be it the illiterate village folk or the highly educated city dwellers, that what they are doing is a sin and an immoral act. Let me illustrate my argument with some examples:.. Dowry is also one of the major factors behind corruption in government system. After globalisation, our desires and greed has increased with the increase in availability of products in the market.

Accordingly, the amount of dowry has also increased. Now a groom with Rs 15,000 plus salary demands a car instead of a motorcycle. Those who cannot afford resort to female feticide or abandon the girl child. Further, despite a law prohibiting child marriage, a Unicef report says that over 47% girls (27% in urban and 56% in rural) in India are being married before the legal age of 18 years, leading to high maternal and neonatal mortality rate. One of the main reasons parents in rural areas marry their daughters at the early age (often misfit atch) is dowry. Further, the Domestic Violence Act 2005 was brought to protect women in the family from mental and physical violence but it has failed to make any impact. Studies reveal that over 95% of women don’t report domestic violence but still 81,344 domestic violence cases were registered in 2008 and 75,930 in 2007 in courts. The PCPNDT ACT prohibits female feticide but every year over one million girls are being killed before taking birth. The law has neither been able to deter people nor restrain doctors from indulging in the heinous crime.

Killing the girl child before birth has today taken the shape of a multi-crore industry in states like Haryana, Punjab and Uttar Pradesh, where the child sex ratio has at many places has gone down below 750. Clearly, many things made illegal by the law are considered morally correct by society. the education system has also failed in inculcating moral values, be it rural or urban population. “Honour killing” also have a gender angle. Most killings are committed by the girl’s family while the boy’s family reconciles with “ladka hai sub chalta hai”, a girl carries the burden of family honour.

If she elopes, her family is labelled to be lacking right “samskars”, hence unfit for “roti aur beti ka rishta”. For the girl’s family, killing becomes necessary for redemption. Besides killings, thousands…perhaps lakhs of girls are forced to marry against their wishes. Matrimonial columns show that the most families, even highly educated ones, prefer same-caste marriages. The youngsters have no freedom of choice. SOME CASES OF HONOUR/HONOR KILLING: * Zarghona 15 lies in U.

P shelter killed by his father because she married to a BOY of lower caste. * Recent cases include a 16-year-old girl, Imrana, from Bhojpur who was set on fire inside her house in a case of what the police called ‘moral vigilantism’. The victim had screamed for help for about 20 minutes before neighbours arrived, only to find her still smoldering. She was admitted to a local hospital, where she later died from her injuries * In May 2008, Jayvirsingh Bhadodiya shot his daughter Vandana Bhadodiya and struck her on the head with an axe. In a landmark judgment in March 2010, Karnal district court ordered the execution of the five perpetrators of an honour killing, and imprisoning for life the khap (local caste-based council) head who ordered the killings of Manoj Banwala (23) and Babli (19), a man and woman of the same clan who eloped and married in June 2007. Despite having been given police protection on court orders, they were kidnapped; their mutilated bodies were found a week later in an irrigation REASONS OF HONOUR KILLING:

The perceived dishonor is normally the result of one of the following behaviors, or the suspicion of such behaviors: * dressing in a manner unacceptable to the family or community * wanting to terminate or prevent an arranged marriage or desiring to marry by own choice * Being a victim of rape * Demanding a divorce , even in abusive relationship * Not following a strict dress code It is important to note that even the suspicion of a transgression is reason enough to justify a killing. Honour Killing – Some Key Facts The United Nations Population Fund estimates that 5,000 women are victims of honour killings every year * Honour killings are likely most pervasive in Pakistan and India, where they are known as karo-kari. Women are treated as property whilst honour is so deeply entrenched in society, that the government often turns a blind eye to these honour killings. Instead, the murders are reported as suicides or accidents. * In a study of female murders in Alexandria, India, 47% of the women were killed after the woman had been raped. * In some countries, men who carry out honour killings escape with lesser penalties.

In India, honour killings are sanctioned by the law[2]. * Teenage brothers are often selected to be the executioner as their sentences are generally lighter than those handed down to adults. If it’s clearly a murder, why don’t the authorities stop it? Just like how bad habits are hard to break, it’s hard to realign deep-rooted beliefs. Officials in these countries often condone or ignore cases of violence against women, saying that it is a private matter. As a result, many honour killings go unreported and perpetrators face little, if any, punishment

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