Introduction to Spectrophotometry

This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer. The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength. The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute. The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted.

Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through. Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it. This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works.

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We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples.

At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual. This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer. The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength. The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute.

The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted. Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through. Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it. This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works.

We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples. At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual. This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer. The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength.

The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute. The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted. Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through. Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it.

This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works. We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples. At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual. This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer.

The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength. The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute. The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted.

Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through. Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it. This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works. We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples.

At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual. This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer. The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength. The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute.

The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted. Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through. Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it. This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works.

We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples. At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual. This lab will teach me how to use a spectrophotometer. The use of the spectrophotometer is to measure the concentration of solute. The solute being measured must be colored and is determined based on the adsorption of light photons on a wavelength.

The spectrophotometer uses a beam of light that strikes the diffraction grating that basically forms of prism of light. Then only a specific wavelength of light shines through the spectrophotometer and interacts with the solute. The light that continues past the solute hits the phototube. The spectrophotometer then digitally shows the amount of units that have been absorbed or transmitted. Transmittance is the amount of light that gets through the sample. This is shown as a percent of all the possible light that could’ve gotten through.

Absorbance is the opposite of transmittance and the reciprocal of it. This shows how much light got trapped in the solute. In this lab we will use a few different solutions in the spectrophotometer to get a basic feel on how it works. We will record the absorbance as well as do calculations using mean and standard deviation. We will then graph our results and compare them with the class values of the three unknown Methylene blue samples. At the end of the lab the actual concentrations of each unknown will be shared. We will then compare how accurate and precise our results are with the actual.

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Introduction to Spectrophotometry. (2016, Aug 09). Retrieved December 13, 2019, from https://newyorkessays.com/essay-introduction-to-spectrophotometry/
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