Literature Chp. 3

Benjamin Franklin
“the Father of the great American Dream”
Benjamin Franklin
Epitomized what the Renaissance term virtu implied: “great vigor combined with extraordinary ability crowned with striking success”
Benjamin Franklin
Born three years after Jonathan Edwards
Benjamin Franklin
Apprenticed by his older half-brother
Benjamin Franklin
Anonymously published in James’s newspaper, New England Covenant, a series of fourteen essays known as The Do-Good Papers
Benjamin Franklin
Wanted to teach his countrymen: Industry, Frugality, and Prudence
Benjamin Franklin
He was first and foremost a printer
Benjamin Franklin
The last portion of his life was dedicated to his country
Benjamin Franklin
Called an “ungodly Puritan”
Benjamin Franklin
To the virtues of the Puritan style-simplicity,utility,didacticism-he added the elegance and wit of the polished conversation of his own age
Benjamin Franklin
Writings clearly depict how far the nation had shifted from its Puritan foundation
Thomas Paine
One of the most prominent Americans of the Revolutionary War period
Thomas Paine
The foremost political pamphleteer of his day
Thomas Paine
He more than anyone else was responsible for uniting the colonists in the fight for independence from England
Thomas Paine
Spent the first half of his life in England
Benjamin Franklin
Born in Boston
Thomas Paine
Met Benjamin Franklin in 1774
Thomas Paine
Spent the last half of his life equally in America and France
Thomas Paine
Had experienced a series of failures
Thomas Paine
In 1776, entered the political debate with his influential pamphlet Common Sense
Thomas Paine
Became editor of the Pennsylvania Magazine
Thomas Paine
Excelled in making concepts understandable to the common man
Thomas Paine
His fiery political writing was successful primarily because he took current ideas and expressed them so that they caught the public sentiment
Thomas Paine
Declared a traitor in England
Thomas Paine
Served as a major spokesman for the new rationalism entering American literature
William Bartram
Reflects the eighteenth century’s new attitude toward
William Bartram
He described what he actually observed in nature
William Bartram
Wrote in a style characterized by scientific objectivity more than that of his American predecessors
William Bartram
Father was the first Native American and appointed Botanist to the King
William Bartram
Contemporary writers like William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge
William Bartram
Writing’s reveal the writer’s scientific interest in the world around him
William Bartram
Work also shows the encroachment of romantic attitudes into American literature
William Bartram
Throughout his writing views God as an active and benevolent force in nature
William Bartram
His work represents the new spirit of scientific observation rising in the late eighteenth century
William Bartram
His expedition was four years
Phillip Freneau
Called our first truly American poet
Phillip Freneau
American in both theme and style
Phillip Freneau
Born into a wealthy French Huguenot family in New York, received his education at the College of New Jersey
Phillip Freneau
George Washing called him “that rascal Freneau”
Philip Freneau
Poetry reflects the issues of his day
Philip Freneau
His poetry reflected the shift from eighteenth century neoclassical to nineteenth-century romantic style
Philip Freneau
Bridged the conflicting poetic attitudes of the two centuries and helped make possible the works of such poets as William Cullen Bryant and Edgar Allen Poe
Philip Freneau
Poetry marks a major poetic shift
Philip Freneau
Poetry signals a significant change in religious attitude
Phillis Wheatley
Brought to Boston as a slave from Africa when she was only a child
Phillis Wheatley
Began to write poetry as a teenager
Phillis Wheatley
Memoirs were published fifty years after her death and three decades later, in 1864, a volume of her letters appeared
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