Man vs Nature

2 February 2017

The relationship between man and nature is constantly evolving as man and nature can coexist in a harmonious relationship or a destructive one with a power struggle. The poem ‘Lines Written In Early Spring’ by William Wordsworth, and one newspaper article “Into those arms no more” by Charles Purcell gives representation to the different views that man can have towards nature. ‘The Surfer’ by Judith Wright is a poem that explores the joy and fear that nature can provide man and ‘The Lorax’ by Dr Seuss is a children’s book that conveys man’s ignorance towards all the benefits that nature can provide man in a harmonious relationship.

These texts explore the evolving relationship between man and nature. William Wordsworth’s poem ‘Lines Written In Early Spring’ gives representation to the evolving relationship of man and nature as a dichotomy between harmonious and destructive. A technique used to convey this is the biblical discourse throughout the poem, “If this belief from heaven be sent, If such be Nature’s holy plan”. This conveys that nature is a manifestation of g-d which corresponds with Wordsworth’s pantheist values and spiritual connection. This shows that Man has a harmonious relationship with natures as he accepts nature’s plans.

Man vs Nature Essay Example

In stanza two and four this line, “What man has made of man”, is repeated to emphasize man’s desecration of nature. In both instances, the persona expresses a sorrowful tone, which elucidates the destructive aspect of man and nature’s relationship. As shown Wordsworth’s poem conveys the dichotomous relationship between man and nature. Charles Purcell’s article ‘Into those arms no more’ also shows that man’s relationship with nature can be harmonious and destructive. Like Wordsworth’s poem above, Purcell laments for the destruction of nature due to man’s interference.

Purcell uses repetition of the word “destroy” to emphasize the harm that man is capable of imposing on nature, “They weren’t only destroying a tree, they were destroying a link with my childhood”. This motif signifies the “irreversible damage” caused by man while also showing that the tree was a significant part of his life growing up. The nostalgic tone, which runs throughout the text, further emphasises the harmonious relationship between Purcell and the tree, that is, man and nature. Within in the text Purcell utilizes the appellation “old man” which acts as a aternal metaphor exploring both the admiration and respect between the tree and the young persona.

This text clearly conveys that the relationship between man and nature can be both harmonious and destructive. Judith Wright’s poem ‘The Surfer’ shows the harmonious and destructive relationship between man and nature. The harmonious side of the relationship is indicated through the sexual connotations in the first stanza, “He thrust his joy against the weight of the sea”. The word “joy” conveys an elated tone, which illustrates intimacy and pleasure that man receives from the sea.

The destructive side of the relationship is evident in the final stanza where Wright uses a bestial metaphor “…the grey-wolf sea lies snarling” and animalistic imagery “wolf teeth… sea crouches on sand”. These lines provide the audience with mans view of nature as having a powerful and dangerous side, and therefore the potential to be destructive. These paradoxical techniques ultimately illustrate how the relationship between man and nature can be both harmonious and destructive. The children’s picture book ‘The Lorax’ by Dr Seuss uses fictitious characters and environment to represent the evolving relationship between man and nature.

Dr Seuss uses simple language and rhymes to convey the universal and underlying theme that man is capable of causing destruction to nature. When compared to ‘The Surfer’ by Judith Wright, one can see that both man and nature have the power to destroy one another. The fictitious character of ‘The Lorax’ embodies the voice of nature and acknowledges that man has the ability to have positive and negative impacts “Unless someone like you cares an awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not. ” ‘The Lorax’ also references man ignorance to others needs; in this case nature.

Dr Seuss uses capital letters and repetition for the word “everyone” in the quote “turning MORE Truffula Trees into Thneeds which everyone concept is explained in the book through man’s selfish thoughts that everyone can benefit from thneeds, but essentially the only benefit is his increased income at the expense of nature. The original use of the truffula tree would be much more beneficial to everyone and thus the message is to preserve nature. Through ‘The Lorax’ Dr Seuss has conveyes the important and evolving relationship between man and nature.

The relationship between man and nature is constantly changing and evolving. This is evident through the poem ‘Lines Written In Early Spring’ by William Wordsworth and the newspaper article ‘Into those arms no more’ by Charles Purcell which show the harmonious and destruction sides to the relationship. The evolving relationship is also seen in ‘The Surfer’ by Judith Wright, and ‘The Lorax’ by Dr Seuss, where the relationship is a power struggle. All four texts ultimately portray the evolving relationship between man and nature.

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