Origin and Spread of Vernacular Language

9 September 2016

Historical Foundations by Barbara D. Barnes AIU Online May 11, 2013 Abstract In this paper we are to report on the origins of vernacular language, or the language that is commonly spoken in a particular region or area, and its spread. Then we will assess and evaluate the impacts the spread of vernacular language had on cultures during this time. UNIT 2 IP Introduction I will be discussing the origins, and spread, of the vernacular language. I will also assess and evaluate the impacts the spread of the vernacular language had on the cultures during this period of time.

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Origins and spread of vernacular language During Roman rule, Latin was the common language spoken; especially in religion (church) and the court. However, over time, the language started to change. Latin was still customary to some social classes, but the vernacular was being used more and more. Vernacular language was beginning to be favored more as it was used to help with religion too. Vernacular languages, or the common language of that region or area, started being used more in the 12th century by writers.

It became an important part of poetry and was used by the Troubadours and Trobairitz of that time so that it was available to a larger group of people that wanted the access to the romantic literature. Noble women played a big part in the vernacular being used more because they preferred their plays and poems written in it. By the 13th century, vernacular language was being used in important government and legal documents in England and in France and by the 14th century it had spread throughout most of Europe.

By the 15th century, vernacular language had become established in literature and historical record. Vernacular language was able to spread as there were still many people who did not speak Latin. And since Vernacular language made it easier to convert people to Christianity, it was used over Latin. Impacts the spread of vernacular language had on cultures during this time Because the vernacular was becoming more recognized, more things began to happen. Vernacular language allowed the church to reach out to more people, bringing them to religion.

Back then, this was very important. When the Bubonic plague hit in the late 1300’s, there was no real way for anyone to be cured of this. The ones that did survive wanted a way to help fight the disease that stole so much from them and decided to enroll in university as they had new ideas on how the disease could be treated. Because of this, the text books started being written in the vernacular language. Vernacular language helped to establish a sense of community as well as to separate and define the different languages we have today.

I think the vernacular language also gave women the ability to be a part of something bigger. They became a part of cultural debate and were a large reason for the use of vernacular in poetry. As time went on, more languages developed and the vernacular was the norm. Conclusion Vernacular language has been an important part of society and culture as far back as the 8th century. Today, other countries are still fighting to get back to their old culture (Papa New Guinea being one of them) and have developed schools to assist in the teaching of the vernacular of that region.

Because English was made to be the language there for so long, the people of that country had forgotten how to speak the native language. Now, they are able to learn both languages and have a better understanding of their past. Vernacular languages are extremely important as they keep us diverse and interesting. If we had kept the Latin language, I don’t believe we would be where we are today with religion and literature and even the arts. Or architecture either.

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