Selling concept

7 July 2016

he marketing management philosophy that holds that achieving organizational goals depends on determining the needs and wants of target markets and delivering the desired satisfactions more effectively and efficiently than competitors do. The Selling Concept. This is another common business orientation. It holds that consumers and businesses, if left alone, will ordinarily not buy enough of the selling company’s products. The organization must, therefore, undertake an aggressive selling and promotion effort. This concept assumes that consumers typically sho9w buyi8ng inertia or resistance and must be coaxed into buying.

It also assumes that the company has a whole battery of effective selling and promotional tools to stimulate more buying. Most firms practice the selling concept when they have overcapacity. Their aim is to sell what they make rather than make what the market wants. SELLING CONCEPT The idea that consumers wll not buy enough of the organization’s products unless the organization undertakes large-scale selling and promotion effort. Advantage: When the firm have overcapacity, selling concept become beneficial to sell their product. It can also be applicable in non-profit organizations or societies (See the example).

Selling concept Essay Example

Disadvantage: Selling is largely a wasteful activity because a company truly practicing marketing concept will not need to sell its product. Marketing make selling redundant. Selling consume a lot of organizational resources, as the company force the product on customer. Example: A political party, will vigorously sell its candidate to voters as a fantastic person for the job. The candidate works hard at selling him or herself – shaking hands, kissing babies, meeting donors and making speeches. Much money also has to be spent on radio and television advertising, posters and mailings.

Candidate flaws are often hidden from the public because the aim is to get the sale, not to worry about consumer satisfaction afterwards. The third marketing philosophy is called the “selling concept”. The selling concept proposes that the basic function of the organization is to convince people to purchase its products. Perhaps the – known practitioner of the selling concept in the arts is Danny Newman (1977), who advocates reliance on subscription sales as the means of ensuring survival. His approach relies on sales-stimulating devices such as discounting and advertising.

With regards to promotion, Newman suggests the importance of “floridity of statement and showmanship… we should fill our brochures with readable, entertaining, bright material. Above all, they must be invested with selling thrust”. The problem with this approach is that it assumes that, for any product, a market can be generated through promotional and pricing manipulations. This assumption, especially in the arts, may not be warranted. Furthermore, the strategy that accompanies the selling concept is often undirected and unfocused in an effort to create mass appeal.

This can result in an ineffective promotional campaign and ultimately can disillusion customers whose expectations are inflated and then not realized. The selling concept: Consumer and business, if left along, wont buy enough of the organization’s products. The concept is practiced most aggressively with unsought goods. Goods that buyers do not think of buying, such as insurance and encyclopedia. Also practiced in overcapacity. Aim is to sell what is made rather than what market wants. Consumers will buy products only if the company promotes/ sells these products. The Selling Concept

The selling concept holds the idea- “consumers will not buy enough of the firm’s products unless it undertakes a large-scale selling and promotion effort”. Here the management focuses on creating sales transactions rather than on building long-term, profitable customer relationships. In other words; the aim is to sell what the company makes rather than making what the market wants. Such aggressive selling program carries very high risks. In selling concept the marketer assumes that customers will coaxed into buying the product will like it, if they don’t like it, they will possibly forget their disappointment and buy it again later.

This is usually very poor and costly assumption. Typically the selling concept is practiced with unsought goods. Unsought goods are that buyers do not normally think of buying, such as insurance or blood donations. These industries must be good at tracking down prospects and selling them on a product’s benefits. The Selling Concept 1. undertakes a large-scale selling and promotion effort 2. The Selling Concept is suitable with unsought goods—those that buyers do not normally think of buying, such as insurance or blood donations. 3. Focus of the selling concept starts at the production level.

Any company following selling concept undertakes a high risk. 5. The Selling Concept assumes –“customers who are coaxed into buying the product will like it. Or, if they don’t like it, they will possibly forget their disappointment and buy it again later. 6. The Selling Concept makes poor assumptions. The selling concept The selling concept holds that customers and businesses, if left alone, will ordinarily, not buy enough of the organization’s products. The organization must, therefore, undertake an aggressive selling and promotion effort.

The selling concept is epitomized in the thinking of Sergio Zyman, Coca-Cola’s former vice president of marketing: The purpose of marketing is to sell more stuff to more people more often for more money in order to make more profit. The selling concept is practiced most aggressively with unsought goods, goods that buyers normally do not think of buying, such as insurance, encyclopedia, and funeral plots. Most firms practice the selling concept when they have overcapacity. Their aim is to sell what they make rather than make what the market wants. However, marketing based on hard selling carries high risks.

It assumes that customers who are coaxed into buying a product will like it; and if they do not, they will not return it or bad-mouth it or complain to consumer organizations, or they might even buy it again. The sales concept By the early 1930’s however, mass production had become commonplace, competition had increased, and there was little unfulfilled demand. Around this time, firms began to practice the sales concept ( or selling concept), under which companies not only would produce the products, but also would try to convince customers to buy them through advertising and personal selling.

Before producing a product, the key questions were: Can we sell the product? Can we charge enough for it? The sales concept paid little attention to whether the product actually was needed; the goal simply was to beat the competition to the sale with little regard to customer satisfaction. Marketing was a function that was performed after the product was developed and produced, and many people came to associate marketing with hard selling. Even today, many people us the word “marketing” when they really mean sales.

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