Sentence and Factual Tense Forms

9 September 2016

It is necessary (it seems, it becomes) that he come. It is important that a young man have real friends. b) In exclamatory sentences beginning with ‘How…’, ‘What…’: How strange that she be here! Suppositional mood a) In sentences beginning with: It is necessary that… It is important that a young man should have real friends. (syn. It’s likely + may/might + infinitive It was probable that I might get an excellent mark. ) b) In exclamatory sentences, beginning with: How wonderful…! How strange…! What a shame…!

How wonderful that he should have joined us! How sad that I should leave! c) In negative and interrogative sentences expressing (im)possibility. Is it (un)likely that the reaction should occur? OBLIQUE MOODS IN PREDICATIVE CLAUSES Subjunctive I a) After words with modal meaning (wish, advise, desire, suggest): Our suggestion was that we take a tour round the city. b) After ‘All I ask is that…’, ‘All we needed was that…’, etc: All I ask is that you listen to me.

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Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms a) After conjunctions as if…, as though…: It was as if she were trying to tell him something. ) After verbs be, seem, look, feel, sound: I feel as though I had never been away. Indicative mood can be used when one is confident of the exactitude of the comparison: She looks as if she has a bath every morning. Suppositional mood a) After words with modal meaning (wish, doubt, proposal, advice, suggestion) My advice is that you should take smb with you. b) After ‘All I ask is that…’, ‘All we need is that…’: All I ask is that you should listen to me. c) After words, expressing fear (conj. lest) Our fear was lest we should be late. OBLIQUE MOODS IN OBJECT CLAUSES

Subjunctive I a) After verbs expressing order, request, suggestion: Tom insisted that we be also present. b) After the predicative adjectives (sorry, eager) if the action is regarded as an imagined one: Danny was determined that his plan be realized and his brother leave the house. c) With formal ‘it’ + objective predicative: We consider it totally unnecessary that he be bothered again. Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms a) After the modal expression ‘would rather’, ‘would sooner’, ‘had better’: I’d rather you cried here with us than all by yourself in there. would+infinitive = depend on person: I wish you would treat me more polite. could, might+infinitive = depend on circumstances) b) After ‘wish’: I wish we were both ten years older than we are. I wish I hadn’t come. c) In indirect questions introduced by ‘if’ or ‘whether’ after the expression of doubt: I doubted if it were possible. Wondering if he were sick, I went over to find out. Suppositional mood a) After verbs expressing order, request, suggestion:

He had never suggested that I should visit them. ) If in the principle clause a personal reaction to events is expressed: I’m surprised you should want him to stay in that house. c) After the verb ‘wish’ to express that you want smb or smth to change in future: Oh, how I wish it would stop raining. d) After verbs expressing fear (conj. that and lest): I was terrified lest they should notice me. I am very much afraid that the boy should not go there. (syn. May/might + Inf Liz trembled that her plans might be revealed) e) with formal ‘it’ + objective predicative: I consider it probable hat they should have been given a negative answer.

We regard it as highly probable that he may return soon. f) In indirect questions introduced by ‘that’ after the expression of doubt: I doubted that he should marry her. OBLIQUE MOODS IN ATTRIBUTIVE (APPOSITIVE) CLAUSES Subjunctive I After words with modal meaning (order, suggest, desire, command): I agree that his idea that we go to Alaska in summer was a little bit sudden. Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms After the expressions: It is time…; It is high time…; It is about time… It is time you were here. Suppositional mood

After words with modal meaning (wish, suggestion, desire, command): His fear that anyone should see him was deep. OBLIQUE MOODS IN ADVERBIAL CLAUSES Subjunctive I a) of purpose introduced by conjunctions so, that, lest, so that, in order that: He took a taxi lest he be late again. He spoke loudly and clearly so that he be heard. b) of concession, introduced by though, although, whatever, whenever, wherever: Whatever the reason be, the fact remains. (syn. : may/might + infinitive:

Whoever he may be, he has no right to be rude. Though he might have been suspicious, he gave no sign. Subjunctive II/non factual tense forms a) of comparison (manner) introduced by ‘as if’, ‘as though’ (if the action is presented as simultaneous or prior with that of the main clause): His voice broke as if he were going to cry. He speaks as if he had never seen me before. b) of unreal condition (concession) introduced by ‘even if’, ‘even though’: I shouldn’t take this line if I were you. (conditional mood in the main clause) Even if they had wanted me to stay I should have refused. c) Asyndetic form: Were it all true, it would still not excuse their actions.

Had she not worn an apron, I would not have known how to address her. (literary style) Suppositional mood a) of purpose, introduced by the conj. Bertha dared to say nothing lest he should hear the tears in her voice. b) of concession, introduced by though, although, whatever, whenever, wherever: Whatever you may say, our decision remains unchanged. He will not convince us however hard he should try. c) of condition referring to the Future, to show that the action is possible.

In the principal clause the Conditional Mood may be used, or Future Simple (Indicative) or Imperative Mood: If it should be wet (Cond. ), they would stay at home. (Sup. ) Will you inform me (Fut. Simple) if you should find another way out? (Sup. ) If you should meet him (Sup. ), tell him to phone me. (Imp. ) d) of comparison introduced by ‘as if’, ‘as though’ (if the action in the subordinate clause is presented as following the action in the main clause): He looked at us so suspiciously as though he would run to call the police immediately.

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Sentence and Factual Tense Forms. (2016, Sep 17). Retrieved July 19, 2019, from https://newyorkessays.com/essay-sentence-and-factual-tense-forms/
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