Sex Offenders: Release into Society

7 July 2016

As sex offenders are being released back into society, our sex offender registry laws must be revisited to ensure the safety of our communities. There are more than 650,000 registered sex offenders living among us in the United States today, but some of these are juveniles that are labeled sex offenders and should fall under a different category because their sexual behaviors were consensual (Belkin 2011). Sex offenders should be required to register as a sex offender upon their release into society in order to keep their community safe and aware of their presence.

The life of a typical sex offender is characterized by the crime committed, rehabilitation, sentence served, and return to society. In the article “States Resist Federal Sex-Offender Registry” Ana Campoy explains, states are resisting the federal government’s attempts to enact the “Adam Walsh Child Protection Act” (Act) nationwide, because of the cost and reliability. Texas officials believe the laws in place are already effective, and their communities are protected from sex offenders with their existing registries.

Sex Offenders: Release into Society Essay Example

Ana Campoy explains, those states that refuse to endorse the “Act” will lose federal funding, and the participation of every state is necessary for the “Act” to work. Some states believe that implementing the “Act” would decrease the standards of the present registry systems, and lack the focus on the dangerous risks involved with sex offenders. Ana Campoy clarifies the importance of all states complying with the “Act” in order to improve the current registry systems in place.

Nationwide, increased numbers of underage teens are being placed on sex offender registries because of careless consensual acts with a younger partner. Their names appear on sex offender registries next to some of the most dangerous and violent sex offenders in their state. After being labeled a sex offender their life is over, and they better forget about good jobs. No one will believe that they are not guilty of a horrific crime even if it was something as minor as sending a nude picture of themselves via text (Belkin 2011).

In Georgia if a sex offender fails to register with local law enforcement where they reside an extra 30 years can be added to their sentence. A sex offender cannot live or work close to schools, churches, parks, or any other place where children are present. Local law enforcement has noted that many sex offenders have relocated to other areas because of the strict laws. A local mother, Monica Lukisavage, whose daughter was abducted by a neighbor says, “Nothing is going to be 100% effective unless every single offender goes to jail.

” People that reside in Georgia believe the tough restrictions are necessary to keep their communities safe, and the strict laws will detour sex offenders from repeating their crimes (Chen 2009). All sex offenders upon release from prison should be required to register with local law enforcement. It’s understandable that some so called sex offenders should not have to be registered for life, but the ones that actually caused physical harm to others have to be to keep society safe. The majority of people would agree that it’s important to keep a close eye on sex offenders. Works Cited

Belkin, Lisa. “When a Sex Offender Isn’t. ” The New York Times, 13 July 2011. Web 16 Mar. 2012. . Campoy, Ana. “States Resist Federal Sex-Offender Registry. ” The Wall Street Journal, 9 April 2011. Web16 Mar. 2012. . Chen, Stephanie. “After Prison, Few Places for Sex Offenders to Live. ” The Wall Street Journal, 19 Feb. 2009. Web 16 Mar. 2012. < http://online. wsj. com/article/sb123500941182818821. html>. Sentence Outline Thesis: Sex offenders should be required to register as a sex offender upon their release into society in order to keep their community safe and aware of their presence.

The life of a typical sex offender is characterized by the crime committed, rehabilitation, sentence served, and return to society. I. Sex offenders should be required to register as a sex offender upon their release into society. A. Registering will keep communities safe. B. Law enforcement will know the whereabouts of sexual offenders. C. Neighborhoods will be able to pinpoint unsafe areas. II. Sex offenders must follow the rules of their probation. A. Do not reside within 1,000 feet of schools, parks, playgrounds, or anywhere children gather. B. Mandatory curfews from 10 p.

m. to 6 a. m. C. Must take polygraph once a year. D. Must keep a driving log. III. The federal government wants all states to comply with the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act. A. Some states feel the “Act” is costly and unreliable. B. Federal government will cut off sex offender registry funds to the states that don’t comply with the “Act. ” C. Participation nationwide is required for the “Act” to work. IV. Georgia’s strict rules make it a difficult place for sex offenders to live. A. Failing to register an address could add 30 extra years sentence.

B. Sex offenders are listed on a publicly available database. C. Sex offenders can never live or work near any banned area. D. A sex offender can never volunteer at church or attend. V. Should all sex offenders be listed on registries? A. Not those that were convicted of having consensual sex as teenagers. B. People convicted of streaking or sending a nude self-photograph via text should not be considered a sex offender. C. Violent predators, pedophiles, and child pornographers should be listed on sex offender registries for life.

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