Texas a&M University College Station vs. Stanford University

6 June 2017

College: probably one of the most stressful, exciting, influential, and bittersweet phases young adults experience in their lifetime. Attending a university is a significant objective for many high school teenagers across the nation; however, the true student desire involves selecting preferable colleges to attend. Although the actual acceptance is always a gamble, it is essential that aspiring students apply to colleges best suited for them in their particular situation.

This “person-specific” aspect must be considered when researching any colleges, especially Texas A&M University College Station and Stanford University. As one in-state Texas university and one out-of-state college, Texas A&M University and Stanford University are two schools on complete opposite ends of the spectrum. This is true not only on their well-known academic levels but essentially through the universities’ admission processes, student life, and expenses. When considering which of the two is the “better” college, these various categories must be accurately researched and evaluated.

Texas a&M University College Station vs. Stanford University Essay Example

The admission procedure is considered by many as the most dreadful, tedious, and difficult parts of a student’s pre-college life. This opinion has remained over the years because of the specifications and requirements of each application for each individual university. When looking at Texas A&M University College Station, there are several ways to be admitted. The school requires that all students “successfully complete the recommended or advanced high school program, …a curriculum that is equivalent… or… satisfy the College Readiness Benchmarks on the SAT or ACT assessment” (“Office of Admissions”).

In addition, Texas A&M grants automatic admission to Texas high school students whom “rank in the top 10% of their graduating class” (“Office of Admissions”) or earn a minimum of a certain SAT or ACT score (“Office of Admissions”). Stanford University similarly consists of a fairly typical undergraduate application including personal information, test scores, career interests, honors, activities, and an essay (“Freshman Requirements & Process”). However, unlike Texas A&M, Stanford strongly suggests applicants to “submit official results of at least two SAT Subject Tests” (“FAQ”), clearly dropping hints in reference to its rigorous structure.

According to The Princeton Review, Stanford is ranked the fifth toughest university in the nation to get accepted into (Franek 34), as it is considered an Ivy League school. When looking at admissions, Texas A&M University offers several attainable options to Texas high school students as opposed to the more strict and competitive guidelines placed by Stanford University. The general student life of Texas A&M University College Station, in contrast to Stanford University, is quite possibly one to the most defining factors between the two schools. Texas A&M is agreeably made up of a significantly homogenous student population.

With a student body of 2 percent African Americans, 3 percent Asians, 82 percent Caucasians, 10 percent Hispanics, 1 percent Native Americans, and 1 percent international students, Texas A&M is not a diverse university (Marshall 63). On the other hand, there is “an enrollment of about half men and half women” (“About Texas A&M University”) at the school. Furthermore, it is important to note the strong religious aspect of Texas A&M University College Station in that the students are primarily Christian with multiple religious organizations on and around campus (Marshall 64).

Texas A&M University College Station is fortunate to be “one of a select few universities with land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant designations” (“About Texas A&M University”) in order to apply classroom concepts to real world jobs. The college also contains many traditions that have been passed down to Aggies for years. However, one particular event, the lighting of a monstrous bonfire the night before the Texas A&M football game against the University of Texas, produced devastating effects in 1999 (Mangan).

The burning “59-foot-high stack of logs” (Mangan) ultimately collapsed and “killed 12 students and injured 27 others” (Mangan), resulting in a lawsuit against Texas A&M and the banning of the old tradition. Stanford is well known for its diverse student population. In fact, the college is ranked seventh in the nation in terms of diversity (Franek 41). Obviously dissimilar to Texas A&M, Stanford is made up of 10 percent African Americans, 24 percent Asians, 40 percent Caucasians, 11 percent Hispanics, 2 percent Native Americans, and 6 percent international students (Franek 502).

Stanford explains that its “undergraduates come from all 50 states and more than 60 nations… [and they embrace] a broad range of socioeconomic, religious, cultural, and educational backgrounds. [They] believe that the best education can develop only in a vibrant, diverse community… [and that a] diverse setting at Stanford enables students to investigate and engage in current issues and deeper societal questions” (Diversity at Stanford). This aspect plays a key role in the controversy revolving around the controversy of the use of Affirmative Action as well (“FAQ”).

Also, as a highly respected school, Stanford was the 2005 recipient of a “$500,000 grant from the Goldman Sachs Foundation for the Stanford Educational Leadership Institute. The grant promotes the development of schools and individuals who have the potential to achieve high-quality teaching and learning” (“Stanford University”). This is mere example of the multiple opportunities offered to the Stanford community due to its exemplary accomplishments, similar to those of Texas A&M. Cost is always an area of concern for any student applying to college.

This is particularly important when comparing in-state to out-of-state universities. The annual tuition for Texas high school students at Texas A&M University College Station is $4,371; room and board costs $7,660; books and supplies are $1,280; other required fees total about $2,595 (Franek 533). This adds up to an average of $15,906 per student per year. At Stanford University, expectedly more expensive, the annual tuition is $32,994; room and board costs $10,367; books and supplies are $1,290 (Franek 503).

With tuition already doubling the total expenditures of a Texas A&M student, the average total cost of a student attending Stanford University totals $44,651 per student per year. The difference in the price of the individual schools is obviously significant and should be an area of consideration for all aspiring scholars. Texas A&M University College Station prevails as the less expensive school by a landslide in judgment against Stanford University. Numerous aspects of colleges are evaluated by soon-to-be undergraduates come college admission season.

In the evaluation of Texas A&M University College Station and Stanford University, the admission sequence, social realm, and cost of the colleges are three crucial areas of deliberation. Taking into consideration the polar opposites of Texas A&M and Stanford, college preference eventually boils down to student desires. Texas A&M has proven itself to be easier to get accepted into with several alternative options, a very spirited community of similar students, and far less expensive, making it a clear choice for many Texas teenagers.

However, those students who wish to seek a more challenging, rigorous academic career and widely diverse student population at the expense of higher tuition rates, more power to them. Works Cited Franek, Robert. The Best 366 Colleges, 2008 Edition. New York: Princeton Review, 2007. 9-42, 502-503, 532-533. Mangan, Katherine. “Texas A&M Settles Bonfire Lawsuit. ” The Chronicle of Higher Education. 7 Nov. 2008. InfoTrac. Gale. Clear Brook High School Lib. , Houston, TX. 19 Feb. 2010 . Marshall, Ashley. Texas A&M University: Off the Record – College Prowler.

Pittsburgh: College Prowler, 2005. 1-133. McCabe, Jeff. “About Texas A&M University. ” Texas A&M University. 22 Feb. 2010. Texas A&M University. 2010 . McCabe, Jeff. “Office of Admissions: Ways to be Admitted. ” Texas A&M University. 22 Feb. 2010. Texas A&M University. 2010 . “Stanford University (Calif. ) received a $500,000 grant from the Goldman Sachs Foundation for the Stanford Educational Leadership Institute. ” Diverse Issues in Higher Education. 1 Dec. 2005. InfoTrac. Gale. Clear Brook High School Lib. , Houston, TX. 9 Feb. 2010 . Stocker, Scott. “Undergraduate Admission: Diversity at Stanford. ” Stanford University. 22 Feb. 2010. Stanford University Office of Undergraduate Admission. 2010 . Stocker, Scott. “Undergraduate Admission: FAQ. ” Stanford University. 17 Feb. 2010. Stanford University Office of Undergraduate Admission. 17 Feb. 2010 . Stocker, Scott. “Undergraduate Admission: Freshman Requirements & Process. ” Stanford University. 18 Feb. 2010. Stanford University Office of Undergraduate Admission. 18 Feb. 2010 .

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