The Bluest Eye Essay Research Paper Racism

The Bluest Eye Essay, Research Paper

Racism in The Bluest Eye

& # 8220 ; There is truly nil more to state & # 8211 ; except why.

But since why is hard to manage, one must take

safety in how. & # 8221 ;

When bad things happen to us, the first thing we

ask ourselves is & # 8220 ; why & # 8221 ; ? Most of the clip nevertheless, the

reply to & # 8220 ; why & # 8221 ; is non readily available to us, and

sometimes there is non an reply at all. Racism has

been a construct which has existed from the beginning of

human civilisation. For some ground, the & # 8220 ; whites & # 8221 ;

believed they were superior to everyone who was non

white for a really long clip. There has ever been a

misconception that racism exists purely against inkinesss

from Whites. However, Morrison shows the reader every

facet of racism: Whites against inkinesss, light-skinned

inkinesss against colored inkinesss and inkinesss who are

good off against hapless inkinesss. The latter two are the

most emphatic and the most prevailing in the novel. In

July & # 8217 ; s Peoples, we see the other side of racism, the

opression of Whites.

There are many replies to the inquiry & # 8220 ; why? & # 8221 ; in

this novel. There is non merely one reply to which it

all can be narrowed down or traced back. Morrison

efforts to demo the reader assorted accelerators which

explain ( or can explicate ) HOW racism affected the

characters & # 8217 ; lives. Often, there is truly non an reply

to & # 8220 ; why? & # 8221 ; , although at times, the reader may come across

to one of the many replies to this inquiry.

In the beginning of the book, the reader sees how

the blonde-blue-eyed white miss ( adult female ) has ever been

the conceptualized ideal. Morrison does non ( and

can non ) tell us why this is and has been from the

get downing of clip. However, she shows the reader how it

is and to the extent it affects ( and has affected )

anyone who does non & # 8220 ; fit & # 8221 ; the ideal. From the

beginning, the reader sees how Claudia despises this

& # 8220 ; ideal & # 8221 ; of beauty, cognizing neither she, nor any of her

sisters or neighbours could of all time populate up to. In another

episode in the novel, when Pecola is on her manner to purchase

her Mary Janes, the reader is able to recognize the extent

of the impact this idealisation had ( and still has ) on

Afro-american every bit good as many other civilizations.

Morrison makes a point to stress the fact that this

affected everyone in the novel, whether the character

admired or despised this ideal. Mrs. Breedlove & # 8220 ; passed

on & # 8221 ; to Pecola the insecurity she had & # 8220 ; acquired & # 8221 ;

throughout her life. Her insecurity and self-hate had

been in her since her childhood but it was made worse by

her emulating the film actresses.

The reader foremost sees Pecola encountered with

Ra

cism from a white adult male with Mr. Yacobowski. She goes to

the shop to purchase Mary Janes and & # 8220 ; He does non see her,

because for him there is nil to see. & # 8221 ; The storyteller

emphasizes the fact that & # 8220 ; their ugliness was unique. & # 8221 ;

She does non province this because it is her sentiment, or

anyone else & # 8217 ; s for that affair, but because & # 8220 ; No 1 could

hold convinced them that they were non unrelentingly and

sharply ugly. & # 8221 ; The storyteller states that they

( except for Cholly ) & # 8220 ; wore their ugliness & # 8212 ; although it

did non belong to them. & # 8221 ; This ugliness had everything

to make with the fact that they were black, particularly for

Mrs. Breedlove and Pecola. Mrs. Breedlove wanted to

expression like a film star and Pecola wanted bluish eyes, both

instances were unrealistic and since they could non be the

& # 8220 ; ideal & # 8221 ; beauty, they assumed they were ugly.

Rejection is a byproduct of racism. Rejection is

developed in the metaphors that Morrison uses throughout

the novel. The subject of nature recurs in the novel and

it parallels Pecola & # 8217 ; s rejection. In the beginning of

the book, Claudia tells the reader that & # 8220 ; there were no

marigolds in the autumn of 1941. & # 8221 ; She does non cognize why

the marigolds did non bloom, but she can explicate what

and how it happened. At this point, the reader gets an

thought that there is traveling to be a parallel between this

fact and person & # 8217 ; s narrative throughout the book.

Maureen Peal is an illustration of a light-skinned,

& # 8220 ; reasonably, & # 8221 ; middle-class miss. Although she is non the

& # 8220 ; ideal & # 8221 ; beauty in society, in the narrative, to all the

people in town, she is near to this ideal. In the

description in the novel, she is idealised and in a manner

& # 8220 ; worshipped & # 8221 ; by everyone who knows her. She becomes

everyone & # 8217 ; s favourite in the school. Her apparels are

described absolutely and they are unflawed, as Maureen

herself ( harmonizing to the storyteller ) . Claudia says that

Maureen is non their enemy, their enemy is what makes

Maureen cute and the remainder of them ugly, that & # 8220 ; thing & # 8221 ;

that makes her cute.

Although racism is non the chief accelerator to

everything bad that happens throughout the novel ( it is

more deep-seated issues in society ) , plays a cardinal function in

the development of the characters as persons, as

good every bit society as a whole. Morrison excels in

depicting racism as one of the many issues which can

destroy a individual & # 8217 ; s self-identity and assurance. Although

she, like anyone else, can non explicate and does non hold

an reply as to & # 8220 ; why & # 8221 ; racism exists, she describes in

item how it ( along with other related factors ) can

conveying about an single & # 8217 ; s self-distruction.

Bibliography

Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye.

323

A limited
time offer!
Save Time On Research and Writing. Hire a Professional to Get Your 100% Plagiarism Free Paper