The Tragedy Of Creon In Antigone Essay

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Sophocles & # 8217 ; Antigone presents a changeless battle between the Torahs of work forces versus the Torahs of the Gods. Creon is so swallowed by his ain pride that his point of view can non be trusted. The Chorus, whose prejudice alterations with the narrative, elucidates a more accurate perceptual experience of the drama. Creon is the tragic hero of Antigone as a consequence of his irreverence towards the Gods, taking to the decease of his household. Unlike other Grecian calamities in which the hero has no control over his destiny, Creon, although displeasing the Gods by reprobating Antigone, is defeated by fate in his effort to liberate her. While destiny had long earlier sentenced Creon to his ain actions, the drama s perceptual experience that he about escapes calamity, makes him that much more deplorable. The general perceptual experience of Creon as scoundrel is shifted as the Chorus elucidates that he is so the calamity.

Along with its switching opinon in the drama, the Chorus remarks on proper behavior as viewed by the multitudes in Ancient Greece. Zeus hates with a retribution all bluster, / the mighty self-praises of work forces. ( lines 140 and 141 ) The impression that work forces should be reverent to the Gods is the antithesis of what Creon ab initio embraces. The power is yours, I suppose, to implement it / with the Torahs, both for the dead and all of us, / the life

. ( lines 238 to 240 ) Creon s accepting the supposed power to implement both the life and the dead reveals him as accepting a false high quality to the Gods and therefore cholers them.

The Chorus, in boding the narrative, relates its current events to those of its yesteryear. at last that madman / came to cognize his God / the power he mocked, the power / he taunted in all his craze / seeking to stomp out / the adult female strong with the God ( lines 1058 to 1063 ) This anecdote is a retelling of a past myth in relation to Creon s present twenty-four hours battle. The apprehension that Creon s mocking and twit of the Gods is extremely dissaproved of by the Chorus fortells that he will anger the Gods. It is besides foretold that the lunatic who attempts to kill Antigone will come to cognize his God. The power of this prefiguration accentuates the common vision that Creon is confronting a tragic terminal.

Creon s calamity is underscored by the Chorus concluding words of the drama, The mighty words of the proud are paid in full / with mighty blows of destiny ( lines 1468 and 1469 ) This integrating of the constructs of pride and blue destiny amounts up Creon s tragic fate. With the cognition that his pride and actions caused the deceases of those he loves, Creon is fated to a life entirely, made wise excessively tardily, therefore doing him our tragic hero.

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